Tech

Wyss Center, Geneva, Switzerland - The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes is revealed today in Nature Methods. The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons that are five times thinner than a human hair, and can uncover the 3D anatomy of entire small organs, faster than ever before.

Bottom Line: This study estimates 1 in 16 U.S. women had an unwanted first sexual intercourse experience that was physically forced or coerced. In an analysis of nationally representative survey data for 13,310 women, 6.5% of the respondents reported a forced first sexual intercourse encounter, which is equivalent to more than 3.3 million women between the ages of 18 and 44. The average age for women at the time of the forced encounter was 15 ½ compared with 17 ½ for those reporting a voluntary first sexual intercourse experience.

More than 70% of U.S. adults are unaware that human papillomavirus (HPV) causes anal, penile, and oral cancers, according to an analysis led by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health and published in the current issue of JAMA Pediatrics.

Scientists from the University of Cambridge have developed a platform that uses nanoparticles known as metal-organic frameworks to deliver a promising anti-cancer agent to cells.

Research led by Dr David Fairen-Jimenez, from the Cambridge Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, indicates metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) could present a viable platform for delivering a potent anti-cancer agent, known as siRNA, to cells.

The conductivity of Graphene has made it a target for many researchers seeking to exploit it to create molecular scale devices and now a research team jointly led by University of Warwick and EMPA have found a way past a frustrating catch 22 issue of stability and reproducibility that meant that graphene based junctions were either mechanically stable or electrically stable but not both at the same time.

Patients who attend 'Heart School', as almost every patient in Sweden is invited to do after a first heart attack, live longer than non-participating patients. This is shown in a new study, by researchers at Uppsala University, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

Methanol is sometimes referred to as ethanol's deadly twin. While the latter is the intoxicating ingredient in wine, beer and schnapps, the former is a chemical that becomes highly toxic when metabolised by the human body. Even a relatively small amount of methanol can cause blindness or even prove fatal if left untreated.

Physicists at Uppsala University in Sweden have identified how to distinguish between true and 'fake' Majorana states in one of the most commonly used experimental setups, by means of supercurrent measurements. This theoretical study is a crucial step for advancing the field of topological superconductors and applications of Majorana states for robust quantum computers. New experiments testing this approach are expected next.

Teen girls--but not boys--who prefer to go to bed later are more likely to gain weight, compared to same-age girls who go to bed earlier, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings by researchers at Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, California, and other institutions appear in JAMA Pediatrics.

Despite its proven success at preventing cancer, many adolescents are still not getting the HPV vaccine. A new study from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus shows that physicians' delivery and communication practices must improve to boost vaccination completion rates.

Health care providers must also learn to deal with parents hesitant to get their children vaccinated with HPV vaccine.

Integrated circuits in silicon enable our digital era. The capabilities of electronic circuits have been extended even further with the introduction of photonics: components for the generation, guiding and detection of light. Together, electronics and photonics support entire systems for data communication and processing, all on a chip. However, there are certain things that even electrical and optical signals can't do simply because they move too fast.

Have lights turned on automatically when you walk into a room? Does the air conditioner in the conference room turn on when a certain number of people enter the room?

In today's world, spaces with motion and temperature "smart sensors" are common and generally improve our overall well-being. Often times, data is being gathered from these sensors and is stored and analyzed in order to improve future architectural building design processes.

A team of scientists from Ural Federal University (Yekaterinburg), Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology and other collaborator have published an article about a new method for the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. Today nanoparticles are used in various fields, from biomedicine to magnetic resonance imaging, data storage systems, environmental reclamation technologies, magnetically controlled liquids, various sensors, and immunoassay systems.

The research published today (Monday 16 September) in Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology examined whether there were any effects of taking paracetamol in mid-pregnancy and the behaviour of the offspring between the ages of 6 month and 11 years, with memory and IQ tested up until the age of 17. Paracetamol is commonly used to relieve pain during pregnancy and is recommended as the treatment of choice by the NHS.

Scientists have revealed close-up details of a vital molecule involved in the mix and match of genetic information within cells - opening up the potential to target proteins of this family to combat cancer's diversity and evolution.

A team at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, has discovered the three-dimensional structure and function of this 'mix n match' protein, which helps control a process linked to cancer's progression and drug resistance.