Tech

In the past decade, researchers have engineered an array of new tools that control the balance of genetic inheritance. Based on CRISPR technology, such gene drives are poised to move from the laboratory into the wild where they are being engineered to suppress devastating diseases such as mosquito-borne malaria, dengue, Zika, chikungunya, yellow fever and West Nile. Gene drives carry the power to immunize mosquitoes against malarial parasites, or act as genetic insecticides that reduce mosquito populations.

In March, researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering-- a shared department in the schools of Dental Medicine, Medicine, and Engineering--began to develop a new, low-cost, CRISPR-based diagnostic platform to detect infectious diseases, including HIV virus, the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Today, the method is one step closer to being a cutting-edge diagnostics technology for rapid detection of infectious diseases.

To capture panoramic views in a single shot, photographers typically use fisheye lenses -- ultra-wide-angle lenses made from multiple pieces of curved glass, which distort incoming light to produce wide, bubble-like images. Their spherical, multipiece design makes fisheye lenses inherently bulky and often costly to produce.

As our lives become increasingly intertwined with technology -- whether supporting communication while working remotely or streaming our favorite show -- so too does our reliance on the data these devices create. Data centers supporting these technology ecosystems produce a significant carbon footprint -- and consume 200 terawatt hours of energy each year, greater than the annual energy consumption of Iran.

A new hollow optical fiber greatly reduces the "noise" interfering with the signals it transmits compared to the single-mode fibers now widely used, researchers at the University of Rochester report.

The anti-resonant hollow-core fiber, created by researchers at the University of Central Florida, produces a thousand times less "noise" - and the lowest levels ever recorded from interference caused by acoustic phonons arising from the glass in the fiber at room temperatures.

Despite the important advances in research in recent years, the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is still not fully clarified. One of the key questions is to decipher why the production of beta amyloid, the protein that produces the toxic effect and triggers the pathology, increases in the brain of people with Alzheimer's.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Stroke patients who also have COVID-19 showed increased systemic inflammation, a more serious stroke severity and a much higher rate of death, compared to stroke patients who did not have COVID-19, according to University of Alabama at Birmingham research led by Chen Lin, M.D., an assistant professor in the UAB Department of Neurology.

Australian researchers and their colleagues from Russia and China have shown that it is possible to study the magnetic properties of ultrathin materials directly, via a new microscopy technique that opens the door to the discovery of more two-dimensional (2D) magnetic materials, with all sorts of potential applications.

The perovskite NaOsO3 has a complicated, but interesting temperature dependent metal-insulator transition (MIT). A team led by Drs. Raimundas Sereika and Yang Ding from the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR) showed that the insulating ground state in NaOsO3 can be preserved up to at least 35 GPa with a sluggish MIT reduction from 410 K to a near room temperature and possible transformation to a polar phase. The work published in the npj Quantum Materials.

Researchers from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) developed a new mathematical model to predict economic performance of crops. It can assist the breeders to obtain the plants with the highest possible quality.

A group of scientists from Russia studied the trends in the evolution of amino acid sequences of proteins in vertebrates and insects and traced the factors influencing the process of evolution. The research results are published in the Nature Communications.

Proteins provide for the majority of the most crucial functions of the body. Hence, changes in the amino acid sequences of proteins are a real mirror of evolution, in which scientists can track evolutionary changes and their implications for the body.

The designing, pattern-making and prototype-making process of the apparel industry is a necessary step to confirm the appearance of the desired 3D shape of a garment before manufacturing. However, it is a time-consuming and costly process involving designers, pattern makers and sewers, and the industry hopes to make improvements in this area. 3D garment simulation technology using patterns can visually show the design of the garment without making a prototype, slimming down the laborious and often times waste-producing design and production process.

Adding calcium to graphene creates an extremely-promising superconductor, but where does the calcium go?

Adding calcium to a composite graphene-substrate structure creates a high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductor.

In a new study, an Australian-led team has for the first time confirmed what actually happens to those calcium atoms: surprising everyone, the calcium goes underneath both the upper graphene sheet and a lower 'buffer' sheet, 'floating' the graphene on a bed of calcium atoms.

NARBONNE, France - The Pharmabiotic Research Institute (PRI), Europe's only regulatory expertise centre for the development of microbiome-based drug products, has announced the publication of a review titled "Live biotherapeutic products: the importance of a defined regulatory framework". Published in the journal Experimental & Molecular Medicine, it shines a light on the need for clear scientific and pharmaceutical standards when developing and registering live biotherapeutic products (LBPs), a new and innovative type of microbiome-based drug product.