Tech

March 20, 2019 - Salads were recently in the news--and off America's dinner tables--when romaine lettuce was recalled nationwide. Outbreaks of intestinal illness were traced to romaine lettuce contaminated with Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria.

These bacteria occur naturally in the intestines of warm-blooded animals. Because crops are grown in the natural environment, E.coli may get into the fields, contaminating produce. The results are potentially deadly for people who eat that produce.

Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology "MISIS" developed nanomaterial, which will be able to rstore the internal structure of bones damaged due to osteoporosis and osteomyelitis. A special bioactive coating of the material helped to increase the rate of division of bone cells by 3 times. In the future, it can allow to abandon bone marrow transplantation and patients will no longer need to wait for suitable donor material. An article about the development was published in Applied Surface Science.

The ecological bio-production of xylitol and cellulose nanofibers using modified yeast cells, from material produced by the paper industry has been achieved by a Japanese research team. This discovery could contribute to the development of a greener and more sustainable society. The findings were published on March 4, in Green Chemistry.

Freshwater biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and nature-based solutions which increase the resilience of ecological communities are becoming increasingly important in helping communities prepare for the unavoidable effects of climate change.

Quantum computers are designed to process information using quantum bits, and promise huge speedups in scientific computing and codebreaking

Current prototype devices are publicly accessible but highly error prone: information can 'leak' into unwanted states

Computer program designed and run by University of Warwick physicists can tell when a quantum computer is 'leaking'

Results will inform the development of future quantum computers and error correction techniques

Currently, a practical, precise, minimally invasive way to measure cardiac output or heart function in children undergoing surgery does not exist. New research published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), illustrates how a novel minimally invasive method using catheter-based ultrasound to measure heart function performed with similar precision to a traditional highly invasive device.

A study of almost 500,000 women indicates that taking paracetamol or other painkillers during pregnancy is not responsible for increasing the risk of asthma in children.

The research, which uses prescription data on painkillers, does support earlier findings that women taking paracetamol during pregnancy are more likely to have children who develop asthma. However, it also suggests that the painkillers are not the cause of this increase.

A new tool designed for patients with heart disease is better at predicting death after hospital admission than current tools, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.181186.

"This cardiac-specific tool, or index, to predict death outperforms current general indexes used to predict death," says Dr. Marc Jolicoeur, Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec.

COLUMBUS, Ohio - For the first time, researchers have evidence that fibromyalgia can be reliably detected in blood samples - work they hope will pave the way for a simple, fast diagnosis.

In a study that appears in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers from The Ohio State University report success in identifying biomarkers of fibromyalgia and differentiating it from a handful of other related diseases.

Tiny organisms in a child's nose could offer clues to improving the diagnosis and treatment of severe lung infections, research shows.

Experts found that the composition of the microbiome - the population of bacteria and viruses found in vast numbers in the body - was altered in the noses of children with respiratory infections, compared with healthy peers.

This difference predicted how long children had to spend in hospital and helped spot those likely to recover naturally, potentially reducing the need for antibiotics.