Tech

Snakes live in diverse environments ranging from unbearably hot deserts to lush tropical forests, where they slither up trees, rocks and shrubbery every day. By studying how these serpents move, Johns Hopkins engineers have created a snake robot that can nimbly and stably climb large steps.

The team's new findings, published in Journal of Experimental Biology and Royal Society Open Science, advance the creation of search and rescue robots that can successfully navigate treacherous terrain.

The Lyding Group recently developed a technique that can be used to build carbon-nanotube-based fibers by creating chemical crosslinks. The technique improves the electrical and mechanical properties of these materials.

The paper, "Enhanced Electrical and Mechanical Properties of Chemically Cross-Linked Carbon-Nanotube-Based Fibers and Their Application in High-Performance Supercapacitors," was published in ACS Nano.

A new study in JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, published by Oxford University Press, finds significant benefits to lengthening the amount of time between prostate cancer screenings for men.

New Rochelle, NY, February 18, 2020--A new study has shown metformin - a glucose-lowering drug commonly used to treat diabetes - to be effective at lowering some measures of obesity in children and adolescents. The results of a systematic review and meta-analysis are published in Childhood Obesity, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the Childhood Obesity website through March 18, 2020.

The development of next generation solar power technology that has potential to be used as a flexible 'skin' over hard surfaces has moved a step closer, thanks to a significant breakthrough at The University of Queensland.

UQ researchers set a world record for the conversion of solar energy to electricity via the use of tiny nanoparticles called 'quantum dots', which pass electrons between one another and generate electrical current when exposed to solar energy in a solar cell device.

The collaborative team including an expert of statistical physics from mechanical engineering science (Prof. Hanasaki) and physical chemists (Prof. Sugiyama and Prof. Yoshikawa) developed a new approach that can detect a sign of crystallization in solution before crystals were actually formed. These scientists used the optical trapping to induce crystals in solution at a location where laser was focused. Then a process of crystallization was live recorded through optical microscopy.

Researchers at North Carolina State University have demonstrated a new, green technology for both accelerated screening and retrieving "switchable" solvents used in green chemistry applications. The new approach makes the screening process hundreds of times faster and drastically accelerates the rate at which solvents can be retrieved from solution.

South American volcano showing early warning signs of 'potential collapse', research shows

One of South America's most prominent volcanoes is producing early warning signals of a potential collapse, new research has shown.

Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador - known locally as "The Black Giant" - is displaying the hallmarks of flank instability, which could result in a colossal landslide.

New research, led by Dr James Hickey from the Camborne School of Mines, has suggested that the volcano's recent activity has led to significant rapid deformation on the western flank.

ADELPHI, Md. (Feb. 18, 2020) -- A new algorithm is enabling deep learning that is more collaborative and communication-efficient than traditional methods.

Army researchers developed algorithms that facilitate distributed, decentralized and collaborative learning capabilities among devices, avoiding the need to pool all data at a central server for learning.

A recent study carried out by an international group of building scientists showed that Estonia is among the countries with the most energy efficient buildings in Europe. The analyses of the NZEB energy performance requirements and reference apartment buildings in four countries (Estonia, Norway, Finland and Sweden) showed that the nearly zero energy buildings constructed in Estonia are most energy-efficient, i.e. their energy consumption is the lowest.

PULLMAN, Wash. -- A Washington State University research team has developed a way to address a major safety issue with lithium metal batteries - an innovation that could make high-energy batteries more viable for next-generation energy storage.

It takes a lot of fuel to launch something into space. Sending NASA's Space Shuttle into orbit required more than 3.5 million pounds of fuel, which is about 15 times heavier than a blue whale.

But a new type of engine -- called a rotating detonation engine -- promises to make rockets not only more fuel-efficient but also more lightweight and less complicated to construct. There's just one problem: Right now this engine is too unpredictable to be used in an actual rocket.

Using "BPA-free" plastic products could be as harmful to human health -- including a developing brain -- as those products that contain the controversial chemical, suggest scientists in a new study led by the University of Missouri and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Australia's first plant foods - eaten by early populations 65,000 years ago - have been discovered in Arnhem Land.

Preserved as pieces of charcoal, the morsels were recovered from the debris of ancient cooking hearths at the Madjedbebe archaeological site, on Mirarr country in northern Australia.

University of Queensland archaeobotanist Anna Florin said a team of archaeologists and Traditional Owners identified 10 plant foods, including several types of fruits and nuts, underground storage organs ('roots and tubers'), and palm stem.

Numerical simulations, generally based on equations that describe a given model and on initial data, are being applied in an ever-expanding range of scientific disciplines to approximate processes at given points in time and space. With so-called inverse problems, this critical data is missing--researchers must reconstruct approximations of the input data or of the model underlying observable data in order to generate the desired predictions.