Tech

Enteroviruses are one of the most common human pathogens leading to high number of acute and chronic infections worldwide. The physiological events leading to successful enterovirus infection are still poorly understood. Researchers at the Nanoscience Center at the University of Jyväskylä and at the University of Helsinki have found significant new information concerning the role of Albumin and ions in host cell vesicles that promote genome release and efficient infection. The results may yield targets for therapeutic development.

Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and, in extreme cases, can even cause lithium batteries to explode.

To guard against such ills, engineers often insert glass, plastic or even layers of air as insulation to prevent heat-generating components like microprocessors from causing damage or discomforting users.

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Stock market investors often rely on financial risk theories that help them maximize returns while minimizing financial loss due to market fluctuations. These theories help investors maintain a balanced portfolio to ensure they'll never lose more money than they're willing to part with at any given time.

Berkeley -- Needle pricks not your thing? A team of scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, is developing wearable skin sensors that can detect what's in your sweat.

They hope that one day, monitoring perspiration could bypass the need for more invasive procedures like blood draws, and provide real-time updates on health problems such as dehydration or fatigue.

As the microelectronic industry is now shifting toward wearable electronic gadgets and electronic (e-)textiles, the comprising electronic materials, such as ferroelectrics, should be integrated with our clothes. Nylons, a family of synthetic polymers, were first introduced in the 1920s' for women's stockings and are nowadays among the most widely used synthetic fibers in textiles. They consist of a long chain of repeated molecular units, i.e. polymers, where each repeat unit contains a specific arrangement of hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen with carbon atoms.

Filial piety - the traditional value of caring for one's elders - is foundational to the Chinese concept of family and greatly influences intergenerational relationships. When older Chinese adults' expectations of care exceed receipt, however, it can lead to increased mortality risks, according to a new Rutgers study.

Eating disorder researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have discovered a neurocircuit in mice that, when activated, increased their stress levels while decreasing their desire to eat. Findings appear in Nature Communications.

The first thing that catches an archaeologist's eye on the small piece of papyrus from Elephantine Island on the Nile is the apparently blank patch. Researchers from the Egyptian Museum, Berlin universities and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin have now used the synchrotron radiation from BESSY II to unveil its secret. This pushes the door wide open for analysing the giant Berlin papyrus collection and many more.

A pair of University of Virginia School of Medicine scientists have revealed how E. coli seeks out the most oxygen-free crevices of your colon to cause the worst infection possible. The discovery could one day let doctors prevent the infection by allowing E. coli to pass harmlessly through the body.

A new chip-based platform developed by researchers at UC Santa Cruz integrates nanopores and optofluidic technology with a feedback-control circuit to enable an unprecedented level of control over individual molecules and particles on a chip for high-throughput analysis.

The ability to observe how life works at a nanoscale level is a grand challenge of our time.

Standard optical microscopes can image cells and bacteria but not their nanoscale features which are blurred by a physical effect called diffraction.

Optical microscopes have evolved over the last two decades to overcome this diffraction limit; however, these so-called super-resolution techniques typically require expensive and elaborated instrumentation or imaging procedures.

Conventional oil and gas production methods can affect groundwater much more than fracking, according to hydrogeologists Jennifer McIntosh from the University of Arizona and Grant Ferguson from the University of Saskatchewan.

High-volume hydraulic fracturing, known as fracking, injects water, sand and chemicals under high pressure into petroleum-bearing rock formations to recover previously inaccessible oil and natural gas. This method led to the current shale gas boom that started about 15 years ago.

A soft robotic exosuit - worn like a pair of shorts - can make both walking and running easier for the wearer, a new study reports. The self-contained, portable device, which weighs only 11 pounds, is capable of detecting the wearer's gait to provide the appropriate assistance, even in complex outdoor environments (see related video). It can reduce the metabolic cost of walking and running by 9.3% and 4.0%, respectively, the authors say - a range of improvement that has shown to be meaningful in athletic performance.

Between walking at a leisurely pace and running for your life, human gaits can cover a wide range of speeds. Typically, we choose the gait that allows us to consume the least amount of energy at a given speed. For example, at low speeds, the metabolic rate of walking is lower than that of running in a slow jog; vice versa at high speeds, the metabolic rate of running is lower than that of speed walking.

Countries that relax regulations for regenerative medicines could be causing a downward spiral in international standards, according to new research published today.

Researchers warn that if just one country decides to relax regulations in the field, a heightened sense of competition can spur others to do the same.

It's unclear whether this deregulation best serves competition, science or the patients.