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Both Taiwan and New Zealand have successfully eliminated COVID-19 with world-leading pandemic responses. By taking a particularly proactive approach, Taiwan's response was probably the most effective and least disruptive of any country's, researchers say.

In an article published in the international journal, The Lancet Regional Health: Western Pacific, researchers from the University of Otago in New Zealand, the National Taiwan University and the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control, examine the pandemic responses of the two island countries 9,000 kilometres apart.

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In a recent study, a new algorithm outperformed the standard method for predicting which hospitalized patients will develop acute kidney injury.

Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25.

Washington, DC (October 23, 2020) -- A new artificial intelligence-based tool can help clinicians predict which hospitalized patients face a high risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). The research will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25.

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In individuals with chronic kidney disease who received online peer mentoring, improved patient activation correlated with improvements in various aspects of quality of life.

Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25.

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New research examines the risk of acute kidney injury in people with sickle cell trait or disease, as well as the effect of acute kidney injury on kidney function decline in these individuals.

Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25.

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A new study indicates that Blacks and Hispanics have experienced higher rates of kidney failure compared with whites due to more rapid kidney function decline.

Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25.

Washington, DC (October 23, 2020) -- A new study investigates the reasons behind higher incidences of kidney failure among US minorities. The findings will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25.

Washington, DC (October 23, 2020) -- The results of numerous high-impact clinical trials that could affect kidney-related medical care will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25.

DURHAM, N.C., October 23, 2020 - Burt's Bees, a pioneer in natural skin care, today announced new research supporting the role of efficacy-first, natural regimens to defend, replenish and restore vibrant, healthier-looking skin. The studies will be presented at the virtual Integrative Dermatology Symposium (IDS) from October 23 - November 1, 2020.

The latest research findings from Burt's Bees highlight:

Anti-aging and anti-inflammatory properties of bakuchiol, a natural alternative to retinol that is well tolerated on sensitive and photo-damaged, aging skin.

Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have discovered that neutrophils, the most abundant cells of the innate immune system, have many more functions in the body than previously thought. This finding suggests possible new treatments for many diseases, including cancer.

In a study published in the journal Cell, the research team demonstrate that neutrophils acquire new characteristics when they arrive in a tissue and that these specialized functions help to maintain organ health.

PHILADEPHIA--Treating lung cancer patients with proton therapy may help reduce the risk of radiation-induced heart diseases, suggests a new study from Penn Medicine. In a retrospective trial of more than 200 patients, mini-strokes were significantly less common among patients who underwent proton therapy versus conventional photon-based radiation therapy. Proton therapy patients also experienced fewer heart attacks.

A strategy for giving intermittent, high doses of the anti-cancer drug sunitinib is well-tolerated by patients with advanced cancer and increases concentrations of the drug in tumours, which is associated with improved survival, according to research to be presented at the 32nd EORTC-NCI-AACR [1] Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, which is taking place online.

Researchers at the Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu (IRSJD) in collaboration with those at Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) have discovered that RING1B is a critical gene for the development of Ewing sarcoma, a rare type of developmental cancer that presents in bones and soft tissues. This newly uncovered epigenetic vulnerability in Ewing sarcoma cancer cells opens the door for new therapeutic strategies.

Boston, Mass. - The COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally disrupted U.S. healthcare organizations. Hospitals have faced drug and device shortages and created new ICUs overnight. Care plans have evolved out of necessity, and hospitals' carefully constructed patient flow systems were up-ended.

A UCLA-led review of nine years of social media posts with the hashtag #BCSM suggests that Twitter can be a useful resource not only for patients, but also for physicians and researchers.

The hashtag -- an initialism for "breast cancer social media" -- first appeared on Twitter in 2011. Created by two cancer survivors, it was used to curate a weekly informational chat for people with breast cancer. Dr. Deanna Attai became one of the group's moderators a few weeks later.

BUFFALO, N.Y. - The prescription of potentially inappropriate medications to older adults is linked to increased hospitalizations, and it costs patients, on average, more than $450 per year, according to a new University at Buffalo study.

The research, which sought to determine the impact of potentially inappropriate medications on health care utilization and costs in the United States, also found that more than 34% of adults age 65 and older were prescribed these problematic drugs.