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Have you heard of DNA? It stands for Do Not Abbreviate apparently. Jokes aside, it's the most widely used acronym in scientific literature in the past 70 years, appearing more than 2.4 million times.

The short form of deoxyribonucleic acid is widely understood, but there are millions more acronyms (like WTF: water-soluble thiourea-formaldehyde) that are making science less useful and more complex for society, according to a new paper released by Australian researchers.

The intensive implementation of currently available tools to fight malaria can achieve a drastic reduction in disease burden, but is not enough to interrupt its transmission.

COVID-19 patients with cardiovascular comorbidities or risk factors are more likely to develop cardiovascular complications while hospitalized, and more likely to die from COVID-19 infection, according to a new study published August 14, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jolanda Sabatino of Universita degli Studi Magna Graecia di Catanzaro, Italy, and colleagues.

AURORA, Colo. (August 14, 2020) - A new study from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus challenges a decades-old hypothesis on adaptation, a key feature in how sensory cells of the inner ear (hair cells) detect sound.

A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that changes in weight between young adulthood and midlife may have important consequences for a person's risk of early death.

WHAT:
New research supported by the National Institutes of Health delineates how two relatively common variations in a gene called KIF3A are responsible for an impaired skin barrier that allows increased water loss from the skin, promoting the development of atopic dermatitis, commonly known as eczema. This finding could lead to genetic tests that empower parents and physicians to take steps to potentially protect vulnerable infants from developing atopic dermatitis and additional allergic diseases.

BOSTON - Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have identified a set of modifiable factors from a field of over 100 that could represent valuable targets for preventing depression in adults. In a study published in The American Journal of Psychiatry, the team named social connection as the strongest protective factor for depression, and suggested that reducing sedentary activities such as TV watching and daytime napping could also help lower the risk of depression.

In the spring of 2020, as Massachusetts experienced a surge in COVID-19 cases in the Boston area, four area hospitals conducted universal testing among all pregnant patients at the time of admission for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. At the time, Massachusetts had the third highest rate of infection in the country. In an analysis of the data collected during that time, a team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital found no association between the number of in-person health care visits and risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2. Results are published in JAMA.

Past discriminatory housing practices may play a role in perpetuating the significant disparities in infant and maternal health faced by people of color in the U.S., suggests a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley.

HOUSTON -- Two different types of detectable antibody responses in SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) tell very different stories and may indicate ways to enhance public health efforts against the disease, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (S-RBD) are speculated to neutralize virus infection, while the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein (N-protein) antibody may often only indicate exposure to the virus, not protections against reinfection.

PULLMAN, Wash. - Scientists have found clear indicators for how the interaction of poor hygiene and antibiotic use contribute to the colonization of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bacteria in humans, a problem that contributes to hundreds of thousands of deaths annually.

The findings by researchers at Washington State University's Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health (Allen School) and Universidad del Vale de Guatemala (UVG) were published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Why is the COVID-19 virus deadly, while many other coronaviruses are fairly innocuous and just cause colds?

A team of University of Alabama at Birmingham and Polish researchers propose an answer -- the COVID-19 virus acts as a microRNA "sponge." This action modulates host microRNA levels in ways that aid viral replication and stymies the host immune response.

Influenza-specific bone marrow plasma cells - responsible for maintaining the level of protective antibodies following a flu shot - are short-lived, and decline to their pre-vaccination levels within a year, researchers report. While the findings help explain the lackluster persistence of the antibody response often observed from the annual influenza vaccination, the new study offers insight into how the longevity of the next generation of vaccines could be enhanced.