Body

A survey of over six thousand sub-Saharan households shows an estimated 39% experience severely unreliable access to food. In addition, 49% have inadequate diversity in their diet, putting them at risk for micronutrient deficiencies.

While exercise offers benefits for a wide range of health conditions, it has historically been considered too dangerous for people living with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, a new study published today in the journal Blood adds to mounting evidence that low-to moderate-intensity exercise may be not only safe, but beneficial for these patients.

Activation of CD95, a receptor found on all cancer cells, triggers programmed cell death - or does the opposite, namely stimulates cancer cell growth. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now shown that the impact of CD95 activation depends on whether there are isolated cancer cells or three-dimensional structures. Individual cells are programmed to die following CD95 activation. In contrast, CD95 activation stimulates growth in clusters of cancer cells, for example in solid tumors.

Milking the umbilical cord--gently squeezing the cord and pushing the contents into the newborn's abdomen before clamping the cord--could increase the risk for severe intraventricular hemorrhage, or bleeding into the brain's fluid-filled cavities, in extremely preterm infants, according to results of a study funded by the National Institutes of Health that was halted for safety concerns.

Researchers studying six adults who had one of their brain hemispheres removed during childhood to reduce epileptic seizures found that the remaining half of the brain formed unusually strong connections between different functional brain networks, which potentially help the body to function as if the brain were intact. The case study, which investigates brain function in these individuals with hemispherectomy, appears November 19 in the journal Cell Reports.

What The Study Did: Adults experiencing a migraine of moderate or severe severity took the drug ubrogepant or placebo and reported if after two hours they were free of pain and of their most bothersome migraine-associated symptom in this randomized clinical trial.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

Authors: Richard B. Lipton, M.D., of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York, is the corresponding author.

What The Study Did: This study examined state laws that grant individuals and institutions rights to refuse participation in abortion based on their beliefs, that grant immunity from liability for such refusals, and that limit conscience rights when patient safety is at risk.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

HAMILTON, ON (Nov. 19, 2019) - There has been interest in cannabis being used as a replacement drug for people with opioid use disorder, but research at McMaster University has found it doesn't work.

The research team looked at all research on the effects of cannabis use on illicit opioid use during methadone maintenance therapy, which is a common treatment for opioid use disorder, and found six studies involving more than 3,600 participants.

A new study in JNCI Cancer Spectrum finds that exposure to radiation from CT scans is associated with higher risks of developing thyroid cancer and leukemia.

PHILADELPHIA, PA - Health campaigns on social media aimed at increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination may see greater success, according to Drexel University researchers, if they inject a narrative into information-based posts.

Rates of new anal cancer diagnoses and deaths related to human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection, have increased dramatically over the last 15 years, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The results of their study were published in the November issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

People with prosopagnosia, or "face blindness," have trouble recognizing faces -- even those of close friends and family members. It often causes serious social problems, although some people can compensate by using clothing and other cues. Face blindness often becomes apparent in early childhood, but people occasionally acquire it from a brain injury later in life. A new study of people who became face-blind after a stroke, led by Alexander Cohen, MD, Ph.D., of Boston Children's Hospital, provides clues to what goes wrong in the brain.

COLUMBIA, Mo. - Down syndrome, due to an extra chromosome 21, occurs in 250,000 children and adults in the United States, making it the country's most common chromosomal disorder. Inherited heart defects, thyroid cancer, celiac disease and developmental disabilities are common Down syndrome complications. Only recently has catatonia, a behavioral condition marked by new onset immobility, mutism, withdrawal and other behavioral abnormalities, been recognized in Down syndrome.

Complications following a procedure to treat tongue-tie in babies are occurring that can result in admission to hospital, something a University of Otago paediatrician says needs to be better understood by both health practitioners and parents.

Paediatrician, Associate Professor Ben Wheeler, and his team of researchers from the New Zealand Paediatric Surveillance Unit recently undertook a survey which shows complications including breathing problems, pain, bleeding, weight loss and poor feeding occurred in babies following minor surgery for tongue-tie (ankyloglossia).

Using "Trojan horses" to combat cancer from within the tumour cells themselves without damaging healthy tissues is the aim of this new tool created by researchers from the University of Granada (UGR), the Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), the University of Zaragoza, and the Cancer Research UK Edinburgh Centre at the University of Edinburgh.