Body

A routine test used to monitor patients' breathing may be unreliable and putting them at risk, a study suggests.

Incorrect results can mean clinical staff fail to spot how unwell a patient with respiratory problems is becoming, researchers say.

This widely used method, which counts breaths over a 30-second period, fails to take account of people's irregular breathing patterns, the team says.

The practice - key to assessing risk in many Covid-19 cases - could be improved by increasing the time of measurement to two minutes, the study concluded.

CLEVELAND, Ohio (September 28, 2020)--As legislation relaxes regarding cannabis, it is being used to manage numerous chronic health conditions and mood symptoms. A new study indicates that a growing number of women are either using cannabis or want to use it for the management of bothersome menopause symptoms. Study results will be presented during the 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), which opens on September 28.

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- The pandemic doesn't seem to be changing parents' minds about the importance of the flu vaccine.

It could be a double whammy flu season this year as the nation already faces a viral deadly disease with nearly twin symptoms. And while public health experts have emphasized the importance of people of all ages receiving seasonal flu vaccines during the COVID-19 pandemic, many parents may not be getting that message.

Just a third of parents believe that having their child get the flu vaccine is more important this year, a national poll suggests.

CLEVELAND, Ohio (September 28, 2020)--Menopause is accompanied by numerous symptoms that can interfere with a woman's quality of life, but can they also cause health problems? A new study suggests that they can, with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in women who have two or more moderate to severe symptoms. Study results will be presented during the 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), opening on September 28.

CLEVELAND, Ohio (September 28, 2020)--As one of the most common treatments for effectively managing menopause symptoms, hormone therapy (HT) is also known to provide multiple health benefits, including slowing the progression of atherosclerosis. A study based on Early Versus Late Intervention Trial With Estradiol (ELITE) data evaluated the underlying mechanism of such benefit and will be presented during the 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), opening on September 28.

What The Study Did: This observational study investigated whether presenting comorbidities in patients with COVID-19 in New York differed by race/ethnicity and whether case fatality rates varied among different ethnic and racial groups while accounting for presenting comorbidities and other risk factors.

Authors: Madhur K. Garg, M.D., and Andrew D. Racine, M.D., Ph.D., of the Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, are the corresponding authors.

(Boston)--Hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were vitamin D sufficient, with a blood level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D of at least 30 ng/mL (a measure of vitamin D status), had a significant decreased risk for adverse clinical outcomes including becoming unconscious, hypoxia (body starved for oxygen) and death. In addition, they had lower blood levels of an inflammatory marker (C-reactive protein) and higher blood levels of lymphocytes (a type of immune cell to help fight infection).

What The Study Did: This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates current evidence on the susceptibility to and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 among children and adolescents compared with adults.

Authors: Russell M. Viner, Ph.D., of the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health in London, United Kingdom, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.4573)

It saved lives in past epidemics of lung-damaging viruses. Now, the life-support option known as ECMO appears to be doing the same for many of the critically ill COVID-19 patients who receive it, according to a new international study.

A paper just published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that adherence to infection control processes, especially proper wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) and cohorting strategies, such as grouping residents based on their risk of infection or whether they tested positive for COVID-19, was significantly associated with declines in weekly infection and mortality rates.

Self-discipline, high achievement and diligence linked to better cognitive resilience

People can function well in spite of neuropathology in brain

Evidence shows path to optimize function in old age

CHICAGO --- Our aging brains collect tangles and sticky plaques that can interfere in our cognition and memory. But some older adults with this neuropathology have more cognitive resilience than others, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study.

The reason: their personalities.

In a special session addressing global mental health before, during and after the COVID-19 pandemic held at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID) Professor Vikram Patel H(arvard Medical School, USA) will present a new review of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on global mental health.

He will explain: "Mental health problems were already a leading cause of suffering and the most neglected health issue globally before the pandemic. The pandemic will, through worsening the social determinants of mental health, fuel a worsening of this crisis,"

New research presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online) shows that a shorter time from symptom onset to hospitalisation is associated with more serious disease and death in patients with COVID-19. The study is by Dr Annie Wong-Beringer and colleagues, University of Southern California (USC) School of Pharmacy, Los Angeles, CA, USA, and presented at ECCVID by co-author Amanda Chron.

A contact tracing study presented at this year's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID) confirms the effectiveness of wearing of masks in public, handwashing, and social distancing to protect against SARS-CoV-2 infection. The study is by Assistant Professor Direk Limmathurotsakul, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, and Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, University of Oxford, UK, and colleagues from the Thai Ministry of Public Health.

Analysis of samples taken to test for respiratory viruses over the past five years suggests that the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 was associated with a large drop in circulation of other common respiratory viruses during the first wave. The study, presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID), is by Dr Stephen Poole, BRC Clinical Research Fellow from the Southampton NIHR BRC, Southampton, UK, and colleagues.