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There has been a surge in domestic child abuse during the coronavirus pandemic, suggests the experience of one specialist UK children's hospital, reported in Archives of Disease in Childhood.

In just one month, the number of new cases rose by 1493% compared with the same period in the previous three years, pointing to a "silent pandemic" in 2020, suggest the authors.

They compared the numbers of new cases of head injury caused by physical abuse among very young children seen between 23 March and 23 April this year and the same period in 2017, 2018, and 2019.

Anyone who has ever had cystitis knows that urinary tract infections of this kind are annoying and painful. They can be well treated by antibiotics, but may be fatal if left untreated. These infections are usually caused by what are known as uropathogenic E. coli bacteria when they bind to the cells of the bladder, ureter or urethra with their pili, the thread-like appendages that grow out of them like hairs. But protection is at hand in the form of a certain protein, produced naturally in the body, called uromodulin.

MAYWOOD, IL--A new research study provides possible explanations for COVID-19 patients who present with extremely low, otherwise life-threatening levels of oxygen, but no signs of dyspnea (difficulty breathing). This new understanding of the condition, known as silent hypoxemia or "happy hypoxia," could prevent unnecessary intubation and ventilation in patients during the current and expected second wave of coronavirus.

Use marijuana while pregnant, and your child is more likely to suffer sleep problems as much as a decade later, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study of nearly 12,000 youth.

Published in Sleep Health: The Journal of The National Sleep Foundation, the paper is the latest to link prenatal cannabis use to developmental problems in children and the first to suggest it may impact sleep cycles long-term.

Below please find a summary and link(s) of new coronavirus-related content published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. The summary below is not intended to substitute for the full article as a source of information. A collection of coronavirus-related content is free to the public at http://go.annals.org/coronavirus.

1. How to Safely Reopen Colleges and Universities During COVID-19: Experiences From Taiwan

Breast cancer patients who are overweight or obese might benefit less from treatment with docetaxel, a common chemotherapy drug, than lean patients. An international team of researchers based this conclusion on a retrospective analysis of data from a large clinical trial. Their study was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(Boston)--Researchers from the Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) at Boston University and Boston Medical Center (BMC) have assembled the largest repository of patient derived stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD).

What The Study Did: This survey-based study examines the clinical course of the loss of sense of smell and taste in a case series of mildly symptomatic patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Authors: Daniele Borsetto, M.D., of Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals in London, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2020.1379)

What The Article Says: Studies describing various methods of decontamination to allow safe reuse of N95 respirators are summarized in this article.

Authors: Brooke M. Su-Velez, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of California, Los Angeles, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2020.1423)

What The Viewpoint Says: How surgical global health programs are affected by the COVID pandemic and why global surgical outreach models may need to be rehashed are discussed in this article.

Authors: Parsa P. Salehi, M.D., of the Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2020.1520)

What The Viewpoint Says: How the COVID-19 pandemic can reshape care in patients with cancer to focus on discouraging unnecessary in-person visits, testing and low-value treatments is discussed in this article.

Authors: Bishal Gyawali, M.D., Ph.D., of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.2404)

CHICAGO (July 2, 2020): Postoperative pain can pose a number of challenges for surgical patients and their care providers. A common method to treat pain has been to administer opioids. However, opioids come with a number of different, often intolerable, side effects, and surgeons have been actively looking for other, safer, pain-relieving options.

What The Study Did: This observational study compares the rate of ischemic stroke among patients with COVID-19 compared with influenza in two New York hospitals.

Authors: Babak B. Navi, M.D., M.S., of Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2020.2730)

New research from The University of Queensland has found that women who have hot flushes and night sweats after menopause are 70 per cent more likely to have heart attacks, angina and strokes.

School of Public Health PhD student Dr Dongshan Zhu has found women of any age who experience hot flushes and night sweats, also known as vasomotor symptoms or VMS, are more likely to experience non-fatal cardiovascular events.

"Until now, it's been unclear if VMS is associated with cardiovascular disease, but now we know it to be true," Dr Zhu said.

Boston - The findings of a nationwide survey assessing the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the emotional wellbeing of U.S. adults show 90 percent of survey respondents reported experiencing emotional distress related to the pandemic.