Body

HOUSTON - (Dec. 12, 2019) - When do cancer-prone cells turn into full-blown cancer? A Rice University scientist and his colleague believe there's a way to know.

It may become possible for biomarkers in blood to reveal whether mutated cells have turned a corner toward forming tumors, and how long the process -- depending on the type of cancer -- is likely to take. That could give patients a sense of the risk they face before they become ill.

A new, objective way of measuring flavanol intake has been developed, which could help nutritional experts assess the link between these compounds and their health benefits at scale.

In the first study of its kind published in Nature Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of Reading, the University of California Davis and Mars, Incorporated have identified and validated the first biomarkers for flavanol- and procyanidin intake at scale.

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- Not getting enough water is enough to make you feel sluggish and give you a headache, but a new Penn State study suggests it may also relate to cognitive performance.

The researchers investigated whether hydration levels and water intake among older adults was related with their scores on several tests designed to measure cognitive function. They found that among women, lower hydration levels were associated with lower scores on a task designed to measure motor speed, sustained attention, and working memory. They did not find the same result for men.

A new drug candidate is more likely to be approved for use if it targets a gene known to be linked to the disease; a finding that can help pharmaceutical companies to focus their drug development efforts. Emily King and colleagues from AbbVie report these findings in a new study published 12th December in PLOS Genetics.

SAN ANTONIO, TX - In the updated results from NRG Oncology/NSABP B-42 trial through 10 years of observation, extending letrozole therapy for additional five years after five years of adjuvant endocrine therapy resulted in a statistically significant improvement in the 10-year disease-free survival (DFS) of postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. The study continues to show no difference in overall survival with letrozole compared to placebo. The findings were presented at the 2019 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held December 10-14.

A new study by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia Mailman School of Public Health is the first to compile the estimated per-case costs of six childhood health conditions linked to air pollution--estimates that can be incorporated into benefits assessments of air pollution regulations and climate change mitigation policies. Results appear in the journal Environmental Research.

NEW YORK - Nearly one-quarter of people living with HIV were willing to risk near-certain death in a clinical trial, if volunteering for the trial would help find a cure for the disease, according to the new study "HIV Cure Research." "I am not going to live forever," said one interviewee, "it is about the next man, the next woman, and you have to have the mindset to care about people, which I do." Another interviewee said, "I'm willing to go the course for the cure and for the HIV community.

(SACRAMENTO) -- Stronger comprehensive background check (CBC) policies enacted 2014 in Washington and 2015 in Oregon require private gun sellers to conduct background checks before selling firearms.

But have these newly enacted laws resulted in more background checks for private-party sales - the major source of guns for persons who commit crimes and are prohibited from owning them?

AURORA, Colo. (Dec. 11, 2019) - A major study conducted by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Prevention and Early Treatment of Acute Lung Injury (PETAL) Network into whether high doses of vitamin D can improve health outcomes for critically ill patients has concluded that such supplements do not reduce mortality or improve other non-fatal outcomes.

NEW YORK, NY (Dec. 11, 2019)--An estimated 30% of adults experience insomnia, and a new study by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons suggests that diet may be partly to blame.

The study found that postmenopausal women who consumed a diet high in refined carbohydrates--particularly added sugars--were more likely to develop insomnia.

Women whose diet included higher amounts of vegetables, fiber, and whole fruit (not juice) were less likely to develop problems with insomnia.

In the last decade, scientists discovered that blocking a key regulator of the immune system helped unleash the body's natural defenses against several forms of cancer, opening up a new era of cancer immunotherapy. Now Yale scientists have essentially flipped this script and found that when impaired a molecularly similar regulator can cause the damaging immune system attacks on skin and organs that are the hallmark of the autoimmune disease lupus, they report Dec. 11 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Getting premature babies to breathe without assistance has always been a stressful mission for doctors. But by carefully ventilating babies with 100% oxygen researchers have found a way to jump-start these first independent moments.

Spontaneous breathing at birth is critical so that doctors can avoid using invasive respiratory interventions on fragile newborns. But hypoxia - a lack of adequate oxygen supply to the body - is a huge inhibitor of natural breathing and a particularly large risk for premature babies.

Influenza can be especially dangerous for children, who are at greater risk for serious complications from the illness, including hospitalization and even death. Yet child care centers in the U.S. rarely require children or the adults who care for them to be vaccinated against flu, according to a new study published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

Nurses sleep nearly an hour and a half less before work days compared to days off, which hurts patient care and safety, finds a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. The findings are published in Sleep Health, the journal of the National Sleep Foundation.

"Nurses are sleeping, on average, less than recommended amounts prior to work, which may have an impact on their health and performance on the job," said Amy Witkoski Stimpfel, PhD, RN, assistant professor at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and the study's lead author.

WASHINGTON -- Brain imaging of veterans with Gulf War illness show varying abnormalities after moderate exercise that can be categorized into two distinct groups -- an outcome that suggests a more complex illness that previously thought.