Body

Sophia Antipolis, 2 April 2020: The effects of exercise on metabolism are even greater than scientists believed. That's the finding of a unique study published today in Cardiovascular Research, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1

The study is the first to examine the metabolic effects of exercise while carefully controlling for differences between participants in diet, stress, sleep patterns, and work environment.

Reasonably good evidence suggests that most diets result in similar modest weight loss and improvements in cardiovascular risk factors over a period of six months, compared with a usual diet, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

Weight reduction at the 12 month follow-up diminished, and improvements in cardiovascular risk factors largely disappeared, except in association with the Mediterranean diet, which saw a small but important reduction in 'bad' LDL cholesterol.

Tumours in infants biologically distinct from older patients

Study finds genetic vulnerabilities to existing targeted drugs

Clinical trials to offer hope for families of youngest patients

Brain cancer in infants is biologically distinct from other childhood brain tumours and could be successfully treated with targeted drugs, a new study has shown.

An aggressive type of brain tumour, called high-grade glioma, is almost always fatal in older children - with only 20 per cent surviving for more than five years.

HOUSTON -- A one-year follow-up study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center revealed a majority of patients with mantle cell lymphoma resistant to prior therapies may benefit from treatment with CD19-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Findings were published in the April 1 online issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

MINNEAPOLIS - Depression is common in people with Parkinson's disease and contributes to faster physical and mental decline, but it is often overlooked and undertreated. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has shown promising results for treating depression in people with Parkinson's, yet many people don't have access to therapists who understand Parkinson's and can provide this evidence-based depression treatment.

People with Parkinson's disease who engage in cognitive behavioral therapy -- a form of psychotherapy that increases awareness of negative thinking and teaches coping skills -- are more likely to overcome depression and anxiety, according to a Rutgers study.

The study was published in the journal Neurology.

About 50 percent of people diagnosed with Parkinson's disease will experience depression, and up to 40 percent have an anxiety disorder.

In an effort to provide safer working environments for nuclear medicine professionals and their patients, clinics across five continents have shared their approaches to containing the spread of COVID-19 in a series of editorials, published ahead of print in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. This compilation of strategies, experiences and precautions is intended to support nuclear medicine clinics as they make decisions regarding patient care.

The causes of 40 percent of all cases of certain medulloblastoma - dangerous brain tumors affecting children - are hereditary. These are the findings of a recent genetic analysis carried out by scientists from the Hopp Children's Cancer Center (KiTZ), the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and numerous colleagues around the world, which have just been published in the scientific journal Nature. A genetic defect that occurs in 15 percent of these children plays a key role by destabilizing the production and breakdown of proteins.

Hamilton, ON (April 1, 2020) - An international team including McMaster University researchers has come together to issue guidelines for health-care workers treating intensive care unit (ICU) patients with COVID-19.

The Surviving Sepsis Campaign COVID-19 panel has released 54 recommendations on such topics as infection control, laboratory diagnosis and specimens, the dynamics of blood flow support, ventilation support, and COVID-19 therapy.

The panel of 36 experts, with six from McMaster, telescoped what would have been more than a year of work into less than three weeks.

Tobacco smoking has been identified as a major risk factor for developing Coronavirus (COVID-19) and complications that may arise as a result.1 In addition, second-hand smoke increases the risk of acute respiratory infections.2 Therefore, official advice is for people to stop smoking tobacco to minimize the risks associated with the current Coronavirus pandemic1. This information may feel alarming and anxiety inducing for people who currently smoke. However, there are evidence-based ways to increase the chances of successfully quitting.

LOS ANGELES (March 31, 2020) - In a new pre-clinical study published this week in the journal Leukemia, the research team of Children's Hospital Los Angeles investigator Hisham Abdel-Azim, MD, MS, worked with colleagues to engineer T-cells to identify and target multiple sites on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells instead of just one.

A paper published in the academic journal Neuro-Oncology by NF experts has demonstrated an increased understanding of low grade gliomas (LGG) occurring in children and adults with NF1. While the biology of LGG has become better known over the past decade, the complexities of these tumors have inhibited practical application of this knowledge to NF1 related LGGs, which can potentially impact close to a third of NF1 patients. According to Dr.

Researchers from the University of British Columbia (UBC) and the Central South University (CSU) in China have for the first time identified a gene that increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

This is a combined press release between EMBL, the Hopp Children's Cancer Center Heidelberg and the German Cancer Consortium.

Medulloblastomas are among the most common malignant brain tumours affecting children. They spread from the cerebellum to the surrounding tissue and can also spread to other parts of the central nervous system via the cerebrospinal fluid. Because these tumours grow rapidly, physicians do not have much time to find a suitable treatment.