Body

Sleep hygiene, which includes practices like providing a cool and quiet sleeping environment or reading before bed time to help kids unwind, is increasingly popular among parents looking to ensure their children get a good night's rest. But are these practices all they're cracked up to be? University of British Columbia sleep expert and nursing professor Wendy Hall recently led a review of the latest studies to find out.

DALLAS, December 3, 2018 --Full marathons may significantly raise concentrations of several biomarkers of strain on the heart, according to new research in Circulation, Journal of the American Heart Association.

Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018, SAN DIEGO: At the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting, Cleveland Clinic medical hematologist and oncologist Aziz Nazha, M.D., will present results of a personalized prediction model that surpassed current prediction models for Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS).

A follow-up analysis of patients enrolled in a Phase I/II multi-center trial for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) reported 51 percent of patients receiving an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T) called axi-cel were still alive two years post-treatment. Axi-cel was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treatment of DLBCL in October 2017 and by the European Commission in August 2018.

People with epilepsy living in high crime neighborhoods in Chicago had three times as many seizures as those living in neighborhoods with lower crime rates according to new research from the University of Illinois at Chicago presented at the American Epilepsy Society 2018 conference in New Orleans.

Only around a fifth of women at higher risk of developing breast cancer think they need to take a drug proven to help prevent the disease, according to new research funded by Cancer Research UK and published today (Monday) in Clinical Breast Cancer.*

Around 72% said they were worried about the long-term effects of tamoxifen and 57% believed that the drug would give them unpleasant side-effects.

Note: These presentations at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting are abstracts #93 and #1626. Abstract #93 is titled Checkpoint Blockade Therapy May Sensitize Aggressive and Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma to Subsequent Therapy. The study will be presented in the Pacific Ballroom at the Marriott Marquis San Diego in California, at 1 pm EST. Abstract #1626 is titled Checkpoint Blockade Therapy May Sensitize Hodgkin Lymphoma to Subsequent Therapy. The poster will be presented in Hall GH at the San Diego Convention Center at 9:15 pm EST.

PHILADELPHIA - In an update to a global clinical trial stretching from Philadelphia to four continents, the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy Kymriah® (tisagenlecleucel, formerly CTL019) led to long-lasting remissions in patients with relapsed/refractory (r/r) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The most recent results from the trial will be presented today at the 60th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Diego (Abstract #1684). Stephen J.

A study recently published in Translational Psychiatry, a Nature journal, has shown how using cultured cells from patients with psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia, to investigate abnormalities in nerve connections in the brain could lead to new treatments. Strong correlations were observed between the findings in the cells in culture--grown outside the body in a controlled environment--and findings from brain imaging performed on the very same human participants.

Scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research (CPR), Osaka University, and collaborators have developed a new rapid and inexpensive way to accurately detect the margins between cancer and non-cancerous tissue during breast surgery. Their system is noteworthy in that it can detect the morphology of the cells, differentiating between cells that are more or less dangerous.