Body

Since its invention during the Second World War for soldiers stationed in countries where malaria transmission rates were high, researchers have worked to pinpoint precisely how DEET actually affects mosquitos.

(Boston)--Does yo-yo dieting drive compulsive eating? There may be a connection.

According to Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers the chronic cyclic pattern of overeating followed by undereating, reduces the brain's ability to feel reward and may drive compulsive eating. This finding suggests that future research into treatment of compulsive eating behavior should focus on rebalancing the mesolimbic dopamine system--the part of the brain responsible for feeling reward or pleasure.

An artificial intelligence (AI) tool--trained on roughly a million screening mammography images--identified breast cancer with approximately 90 percent accuracy when combined with analysis by radiologists, a new study finds.

Led by researchers from NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Center for Data Science, the study examined the ability of a type of AI, a machine learning computer program, to add value to the diagnoses reached by a group of 14 radiologists as they reviewed 720 mammogram images.

There is no effective vaccine currently available to prevent Lyme disease in humans.

Experts from academia, government, and industry convened at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's Banbury Center to tackle this public health challenge. Now, a new paper published in the October 17 2019 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases highlights the conference discussions, reiterates the need to stop the infection, and defines a strategy for developing effective vaccines.

A chance finding ten years ago led to the creation by researchers of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) of the first mice born with much longer telomeres than normal in their species. Given the relationship between telomeres and ageing - telomeres shorten throughout life, so older organisms have shorter telomeres -, scientists launched a study generating mice in which 100% of their cells had hyper-long telomeres.

DALLAS, Oct. 17, 2019 -- Young adults who suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be more likely to experience a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or major stroke event by middle age, raising the risk as much as other better-known risk factors, according to new research published in Stroke, a journal of the American Stroke Association, a division of the American Heart Association.

When young athletes experiences sudden cardiac death as they run down the playing field, it's usually due to arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), an inherited heart disease. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have shed new light on the role of the immune system in the progression of ACM and, in the process, discovered a new drug that might help prevent ACM disease symptoms and progression to heart failure in some patients.

SINGAPORE, 17 October 2019 - A congenital heart condition known as left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC) - which occurs when muscly projections in the embryonic heart fail to transform into compact heart muscle - could be caused by signalling defects, according to new preclinical research led by Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore. The finding, published in the journal JCI Insight, could pave the way towards potential diagnosis and therapies.

A team of researchers led by Yale-NUS College has found evidence that metabolic dysfunction is a primary cause of Alzheimer's disease.

A new study published today by the scientific journal Addiction found a positive link between the number of people in England giving up smoking when using e-cigarettes to try and quit.

Philadelphia, October 17, 2019 - Not all fats are equal in how they affect our skin, according to a new study in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, published by Elsevier. The investigators found that different ketogenic diets impacted skin inflammation differently in psoriasiform-like skin inflammation in mice.

Sophia Antipolis, 17 October 2019: Drinking small amounts of alcohol frequently is linked with a higher likelihood of atrial fibrillation than binge drinking, according to research published today in EP Europace, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1

A multicenter randomized clinical trial evaluating a new artificial pancreas system - which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels - has found that the new system was more effective than existing treatments at controlling blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes.

A multicenter randomized clinical trial evaluating a new artificial pancreas system -- which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels -- has found that the new system was more effective than existing treatments at controlling blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes. The trial, based partly at the University of Virginia Center for Diabetes Technology, was primarily funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health.

A new artificial pancreas system that uses advanced control algorithms to automatically monitor and regulate blood glucose levels was more effective than existing treatments at controlling blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes, according to a multicenter randomized clinical trial based partly at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.