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The world has been hit hard by coronavirus, and health services and authorities everywhere are struggling to reduce the spread, combat the disease and protect the population. Nevertheless, the pandemic will cost lives throughout the world. An environmental researcher from Aarhus University has studied whether there could be a link between the high mortality rate seen in northern Italy, and the level of air pollution in the same region. The short answer is "yes possibly". The long answer is in the article below.

Consuming a diet high in fiber was linked with a reduced incidence of breast cancer in an analysis of all relevant prospective studies. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS).

Ann Arbor, April 6, 2020 - A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, reports valuable new grip strength metrics that provide healthcare practitioners with an easy-to-perform, time-efficient screening tool for type 2 diabetes (T2DM).

A larger thigh circumference may be associated with lower blood pressure and a reduced risk of heart disease in people with obesity, according to a study published in Endocrine Connections. In overweight and obese Chinese men and women, larger thigh circumferences were associated with lower blood pressure. These findings suggest that carrying more weight on the thighs may be a marker of better heart health in Chinese obese and overweight people, who are at a greater risk of heart disease.

DOCTORS and nurses on the COVID-19 frontline are spending many hours a day wearing face masks, and many members of the general public are doing the same. But although the devices offer invaluable protection, they can be the cause of significant skin damage through sweating and the rubbing of the masks against the nose.

Skincare experts at the University of Huddersfield are warning about the risks and are suggesting remedies.

April 03, 2020-- In a new study, researchers identified the most common characteristics of 85 COVID-19 patients who died in Wuhan, China in the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic. The study reports on commonalities of the largest group of coronavirus patient deaths to be studied to date. The paper was published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Human cells respond to stresses like DNA damage, metabolic imbalance and starvation by first trying to repair the problem. If that does not work, the cells then induce programmed cell death, called apoptosis. Apoptosis is a highly regulated cell fate decision that removes about 50 billion to 70 billion cells each day in adults.

A case study of a patient in Wuhan, China, suggests that the immunosuppressant tocilizumab may be an effective COVID-19 treatment for very ill patients who also have multiple myeloma and other blood cancers.

The report, published in Blood Advances, also suggests that blood cancer patients may have atypical COVID-19 symptoms.

What The Viewpoint Says: Whether individuals should continue to take angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in the context of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is discussed in this article.

Authors: Majd AlGhatrif, M.D., M.A., of the National Institutes of Health in Baltimore, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ 

(doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.1329)

What The Viewpoint Says: Discussion of recommendations for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin receptor blocker use in patients with or at risk of contracting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Authors: Franz H. Messerli, M.D., of Bern University Hospital in Switzerland, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ 

(doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.1282)

What The Viewpoint Says: Information on the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic that is useful for pediatric clinicians is in this article.

Authors: Sonja A. Rasmussen, M.D., M.S., of the University of Florida College of Medicine in Gainesville, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.1224)

WASHINGTON, April 3, 2020 -- You might have heard that COVID-19 vaccine trials are underway in Seattle. What exactly is being tested? How much longer will these tests take? And when can we expect a vaccine against the novel coronavirus? We chat with Benjamin Neuman, Ph.D., one of the world's experts on coronavirus, and Daniel Wrapp, one of the scientists who mapped the structure of the protein that the coronavirus uses to infect your cells, to help us answer these questions: https://youtu.be/gDY8pH6OWBc.

Experts writing in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease discuss potentially grave consequences for Parkinson's disease patients related to social distancing, but also opportunities like new avenues for research and initiatives that may offer positive help and support

Surgical masks may help prevent infected people from making others sick with seasonal viruses, including coronaviruses, according to new research that could help settle a fierce debate spanning clinical and cultural norms.

PHILADELPHIA - An increased proportion of Indigenous American (IA) ancestry was associated with a greater incidence of HER2-positive breast cancer, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.