Tech

Highlights

- Secure data backup of medical records based on secret sharing

- Restoration of medical records via a satellite link within 9 sec after searching a patient ID

- Cross reference of medical records between different organizations using standardized data format

Abstract

WASHINGTON, D.C., December 12, 2019 -- Offshore wind power generation has become an increasingly promising source of renewable energy. Much about the aerodynamic effects of larger wind farms, however, remains poorly understood. New work in this week's Journal of Renewable and Sustainably Energy, from AIP Publishing, looks to provide more insight in how the structures necessary for wind farms affect air flow.

Strong and tough yet as light as a feather - materials with this exceptional combination of properties are urgently needed in many industrial sectors and in medicine, as well as being of great interest for scientific research. A research team from the University of Bayreuth has now developed polymer fibres with precisely these properties. Together with partners in Germany, China and Switzerland, the polymer fibers were characterized. The scientists have published their results in the journal Science.

WASHINGTON--The Endocrine Society and Avalere Health introduced the first-ever quality measures to help healthcare providers assess how well they identify and care for older adults at greater risk of hypoglycemia--low blood sugar that can be a dangerous complication of diabetes treatment.

Fewer than 10% of dermatologists practice in rural areas, according to the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. That means primary care physicians (PCPs) are often relied upon to diagnose skin cancers in areas where access to dermatologists is lacking, even though multiple studies have shown most PCPs do not feel adequately prepared to diagnose and treat many skin conditions.

Someday, doctors would like to grow limbs and other body tissue for soldiers who have lost arms in battle, children who need a new heart or liver, and many other people with critical needs. Today, medical professionals can graft cells from a patient, deposit them onto a tissue scaffold, and insert the scaffold into the body to encourage the growth of bone, cartilage and other specialized tissue. But researchers are still working toward building complex organs that can be implanted into patients.

CHAPEL HILL, NC - December 12, 2019 - Scientists have known that a region of the brain called the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) plays a role in behaviors related to alcohol use and consumption in general. It's been less known which precise populations of brain cells and their projections to other brain regions mediate these behaviors. Now, UNC School of Medicine scientists discovered that specific neurons in the CeA contribute to reward-like behaviors, alcohol consumption in particular.

DURHAM, N.C. -- Scientists from Duke University have developed a model that can predict the amount of mercury being released into a local ecosystem by deforestation and small-scale gold mining.

The research, which appears online on December 11 in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, could point toward ways to mitigate the worst effects of mercury poisoning in regions such as those that are already experiencing elevated mercury levels caused by gold mining.

GALVESTON, Texas - Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston showed, for the first time, that a single, higher dose of vaccination to a pregnant mouse safely protects both her and her fetus from the Zika virus.

The researchers found that a single, less potent dose was not enough to protect the fetus. The findings are currently available in Nature Communications.

HOUSTON - (Dec. 12, 2019) - Molecular drills have gained the ability to target and destroy deadly bacteria that have evolved resistance to nearly all antibiotics. In some cases, the drills make the antibiotics effective once again.

Researchers at Rice University, Texas A&M University, Biola University and Durham (U.K.) University showed that motorized molecules developed in the Rice lab of chemist James Tour are effective at killing antibiotic-resistant microbes within minutes.

Since their invention more than 60 years ago, diamond anvil cells have made it possible for scientists to recreate extreme phenomena - such as the crushing pressures deep inside the Earth's mantle - or to enable chemical reactions that can only be triggered by intense pressure, all within the confines of a laboratory apparatus that you can safely hold in the palm of your hand.

Safe nuclear waste storage, new ways of generating and storing hydrogen, and technologies for capturing and reusing greenhouse gases are all potential spinoffs of a new study by University of Guelph researchers.

Published recently in Nature Scientific Reports, the study involved the first-ever use of antimatter to investigate processes connected to potential long-term storage of waste from nuclear reactors, says lead author and chemistry professor Khashayar Ghandi.

Small insects that would normally be undetectable to bats using echolocation suddenly become detectable when they occur in large swarms. Arjan Boonman of Tel-Aviv University and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

Bats use echolocation to hunt insects, many of which fly in swarms. In this process, bats emit a sound signal that bounces off the target object, revealing its location. However, few studies have addressed what swarms of insects--as opposed to single insects--"look" like in the world of bat echolocation.

The brain determines when it is time to feed - but how does it know? Findings from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital provide new understanding of how the brain orchestrates this process. Skeletal muscle, like other tissues, communicates with the brain to convey information about nutritional status. The researchers showed that manipulating this mechanism influences food seeking and feeding in fruit flies. This work was published online today in Genes & Development.

New research published today in the Journal of Physiology shows that breastfeeding is crucial in preventing diabetes.

The World Health Organization recommends breastfeeding as the sole source of nutrition for infants until six months of age, as this helps reduce child morbidity and mortality. In contrast, early weaning is associated with both the development of obesity and Type 2 diabetes in adulthood.