Tech

Stroke patients prescribed a common antidepressant show no improvement compared with those given a dummy drug, a study has found.

Earlier research from France had suggested that taking the drug, called fluoxetine, might reduce disability after stroke.

The latest study found no difference between the improvement in physical ability of stroke patients who took fluoxetine for six months and those who took a placebo - an inactive substitute.

Experts stress that people already taking the drug should not stop without speaking to their doctor first.

The amount of time you sleep, including daytime naps, is linked to your risk of developing cardiovascular disease and death, according to a study of over 116,000 people in seven regions of the world, published in the European Heart Journal [1] today (Wednesday).

TORONTO, ON (Canada) - Cell phones - much has been written about their detrimental effects on attention spans, stress levels and dinner table conversations. People are in constant contact with their cell phones at all hours of the day. New research from the University of Toronto (U of T) suggests they could also be a source of toxic chemicals, or at least an indicator of the chemicals to which people are exposed.

Baltimore, MD--The interactions that take place between the species of microbes living in the gastrointestinal system often have large and unpredicted effects on health, according to new work from a team led by Carnegie's Will Ludington. Their findings are published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

New research on the types of bacteria living in babies' noses could offer clues as to why some recover quickly from their first cough or cold, while others suffer for longer.

The study, published in ERJ Open Research [1], suggests that babies who have a wide variety of different bacteria living in their noses tend to recover more quickly from their first respiratory virus, compared to those who have less variety and more bacteria from either the Moraxellaceae or Streptococcaceae family.

CINCINNATI - A daily hydroxyurea pill may finally bring some relief for young children living with the painful and deadly blood disease sickle cell anemia (SCA) in resource-challenged sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease is prevalent and health care availability is suboptimal.

In their phase-2 study of tisagenlecleucel (marketed as KYMRIAH®), to be published on-line Dec. 1, 2018 in the New England Journal of Medicine, an international team of researchers evaluated 93 patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). They found that 52 percent of those patients responded favorably to the therapy. Forty percent had a complete response and 12 percent had a partial response.

Breast cancer survivors who used a smartphone app created at Houston Methodist consistently lost weight, largely due to daily, real-time interactions with their health care team via the mobile app. Few clinically-tested mobile apps exist today with clear measurable goals to support continued care of cancer survivors and patients.

Three U.S. sites are enrolling couples in the first clinical trial to test the safety and efficacy of a gel for men to prevent unintended pregnancy. Today’s launch was announced jointly by the Population Council, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute and the University of Washington School of Medicine.

Fans of the Star Wars franchise will have to wait more than a year from now to get their fix of Jedi-laden telekinetic spectacles on the big screen. The as-of-yet-to-be-titled Episode IX, the last installment of the space saga as was envisioned in 1977, won't be released until December 2019.

In the interim, stalwart practitioners of Jedi ways and other Force-sensitive beings can look to the small screen and thank Virginia Tech researchers for a recently developed virtual reality technique called Force Push.