Tech

An international team of researchers involving members of the University of Basel's Biozentrum challenges the conventional understanding of the cause of Parkinson's disease. The researchers have shown that the inclusions in the brain's neurons, characteristic of Parkinson's disease, are comprised of a membranous medley rather than protein fibrils. The recently published study in "Nature Neuroscience" raises new questions about the etiology of Parkinson's disease.

Researchers at WMG at the University of Warwick have found that use of inductive charging, whilst highly convenient, risks depleting the life of mobile phones using typical LIBs (Lithium-ion batteries)

Consumers and manufacturers have ramped up their interest in this convenient charging technology, abandoning fiddling with plugs and cables in a favour of just setting the phone directly on a charging base.

Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. That is, provided that the tiny semiconductors convert electric energy into light, and vice versa, at the right wavelengths. A research team at the German Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) has managed to produce nanowires with operating wavelengths that can be freely selected over a wide range - simply by altering the shell structure. Fine-tuned nanowires could take on several roles in an optoelectronic component.

Composers string notes of different pitch and duration together to create music. Similarly, cells join amino acids with different characteristics together to make proteins. Now, researchers have bridged these two seemingly disparate processes by translating protein sequences into musical compositions and then using artificial intelligence to convert the sounds into brand-new proteins. They report their results in ACS Nano. 

Want to create a brand new type of protein that might have useful properties? No problem. Just hum a few bars.

In a surprising marriage of science and art, researchers at MIT have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages. Then, reversing the process, they can introduce some variations into the music and convert it back into new proteins never before seen in nature.

A change is as good as a rest when it comes to remembering more, according to new research by neuroscientists at the University of Sussex.

Dr Michael Crossley, Senior Research Fellow in Neuroscience, used pond snails to study the factors impacting on memory interference.

He found that, when tasked with learning two similar things, snails were only able to store and recall the first memory.

A group of scientists from Japan--led by Prof Takashi Kamakura of Tokyo University of Science--has demonstrated, for the first time, the molecular and cellular basis of the "adverse" effects of the antibiotic chloramphenicol on eukaryotic cells. Concluding their study published in Scientific Reports, they state, "Identification of the molecular target of chloramphenicol may lead to better elucidation and resolution of its side effects in humans."

A new study demonstrates, for the first time, that "social robots" used in support sessions held in pediatric units at hospitals can lead to more positive emotions in sick children.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Run, hide, fight. It has become a mantra for how to act during an active shooter situation. The idea is to escape the situation or protect oneself, and counter the gunman as a last resort.

Imagine if your printer had an "unprint" button that used pulses of light to remove toner, curbing environmental impacts compared with conventional paper recycling.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -- For advanced stages of head and neck cancer, one of the best treatments is so aggressive that it could bring tooth decay, speech loss, constant nausea or all of the above.

That's because the treatment combines two therapies - chemotherapy and radiation - which means double the cancer-killing power, but also double the side effects. A large proportion of the 63,000 Americans diagnosed with head and neck cancer each year are ineligible for this treatment because they are too old or too sick, but most don't know they have the cancer until after the age of 50.

CORVALLIS, Ore. - Broader monitoring of patients is needed to reduce the number of people who develop a urinary tract infection after being discharged from the hospital, new research by Oregon State University suggests.

Findings were published in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. The exploratory study of more than 3,000 at-risk patients showed that infection was nearly three times as likely to begin after they went home compared to when they were in the hospital.

Prof. LIU Bo and colleagues at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) have developed a chiral separation membrane capable of capturing left-handed chiral molecules and releasing right-handed counterpart using two-dimensional layered materials. The chiral membrane, showing a separation efficiency up to 89% towards limonene racemate, is expected to be put into industrial production. The research was published in Nature Communications on June 7.

Stem cells are not only key players in tissue regeneration, they are also capable of taking direct action against bacteria. This is the finding of a study conducted by researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, which describes what happens during a Helicobacter pylori infection of the human stomach. By actively fighting the colonizing bacteria, gastric stem cells protect themselves against damage that can lead to cancer. Results from this study have been published in Nature Cell Biology*.

SAN ANTONIO -- June 25, 2019 -- Inspired by movie streaming services such as Netflix or Hulu, a Southwest Research Institute scientist developed a technique to look for stars likely to host giant, Jupiter-sized planets outside of our solar system. She developed an algorithm to identify stars likely to host giant exoplanets, based on the composition of stars known to have planets.