Earth

San Francisco, CA - June 22, 2019 - Swimming in the ocean alters the skin microbiome and may increase the likelihood of infection, according to research presented at ASM Microbe 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

San Francisco, CA - June 21, 2019 - New research has found that six probiotic Bacillus strains are resistant to several antibiotics. Genetic analysis of other Bacillus strains has shown genes that contribute to antibiotic resistance towards various types of drugs and methods in which they can still grow in their presence. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

San Francisco, CA - June 21, 2019 - New research has demonstrated the presence of S. aureus in 40% of the cell phones of students sampled at a university. S. aureus is a common cause of hospital and community-based infections and is currently considered an important pathogen because of its level of antibiotic resistance. The research, conducted at the Western University of São Paulo, Brazil, is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

The promise of thermoelectric materials as a source of clean energy has driven the search for materials that can efficiently produce substantial amounts of power from waste heat.

In a new survey of the sub-seafloor off the U.S. Northeast coast, scientists have made a surprising discovery: a gigantic aquifer of relatively fresh water trapped in porous sediments lying below the salty ocean. It appears to be the largest such formation yet found in the world. The aquifer stretches from the shore at least from Massachusetts to New Jersey, extending more or less continuously out about 50 miles to the edge of the continental shelf. If found on the surface, it would create a lake covering some 15,000 square miles.

Harmful algal blooms can cause big problems in coastal areas and lakes across the United States. When toxin-containing aquatic organisms multiply and form a bloom, it can sicken people and pets, contaminate drinking water, and force closures at boating and swimming sites.

With limited resources to monitor these often-unpredictable blooms, water managers are turning to new technologies from NASA and its partners to detect and keep track of potential hazards. This is particularly critical in lakes and reservoirs that people use for both recreation and water supply.

BOSTON - As health officials in New Jersey, Illinois and New York State scramble to contain the spread of a highly infectious and deadly fungus, microbiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have shown that a combination of anti-fungal and anti-bacterial medications may be an effective weapon against the recently discovered multidrug resistant, Candida auris (C. auris).

BIDMC's Thea Brennan-Krohn, MD, presented the findings Friday, June 21, 2019, at ASM Microbe 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

Temperature-related mortality has been decreasing in Spain over the past four decades, according to a new study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a research centre supported by "la Caixa". The study analysed the Spanish population's vulnerability to hot and cold temperatures in the context of global warming.

It's easy to think of cities as being the enemy of nature. When we talk about escaping the skyscrapers and car horns, we have visions of breathing in fresh mountain air while hiking through forests in mind. But for Monarch butterflies, the busy cities we know could be key to their survival.

The cumulative stresses caused by historic earthquakes could provide some explanation as to why and where they occur, according to new research.

Scientists have previously struggled to identify patterns for earthquakes happening in hazardous areas around the world, with the suggestion that they appear to strike largely at random.

However, a study published in Nature Communications suggests that Coulomb pre-stress - the static stress present on a fault plane prior to rupture - can go some way to explaining both historical and modern series of earthquakes.

Bacteria living on the skin of frogs could save them from a deadly virus, new research suggests.

Ranavirus kills large numbers of European common frogs - the species most often seen in UK ponds - and is one of many threats facing amphibians worldwide.

Scientists from the University of Exeter and ZSL's Institute of Zoology compared the bacteria living on frogs - known as their "microbiome" - from groups with varying history of ranavirus.

Chameleon prawns change colour to camouflage themselves as the seaweed around them changes seasonally, new research shows.

Unlike chameleons and cuttlefish, chameleon prawns (Hippolyte varians) take weeks to change colour, so the study - by the University of Exeter and the Federal University of ABC (Brazil) - shows that their abilities are suited to seasonal changes to their surroundings rather than rapidly adapting to new backgrounds.

Leipzig/Copenhagen/Villigen/Beijing. For the first time, an international research team led by the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) has investigated atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INPs) in ice cores, which can provide insights on the type of cloud cover in the Arctic over the last 500 years. These INPs play an important role in the formation of ice in clouds and thus have a major influence on the climate. So far, however, there are only a few measurements that date back only a few decades.

Two papers publishing June 20 in the journal Cell show that Egyptian fruit bats and mice, respectively, can "sync" brainwaves in social situations. The synchronization of neural activity in the brains of human conversation partners has been shown previously, as a result of one person picking up social cues from the other and modulating their own behavior based on those cues.

Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted threadworm that is endemic in many tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have conducted a nation-wide parasitology survey of the Cambodian population and concluded that nearly a third of the studied population is infected with S. stercoralis.