Earth

"Yellow streaks in sunset sky, wind and daylong rain is nigh". This old world-widely weather proverb originates from aged fishermen by finding recognizable colors and shapes in clouds at sunset to predict an incoming storm. Nowadays, state-of-the-art satellites observations for tropical cyclone clouds structures, as well as the evolution of surrounding weather systems, are utilized to assist weather forecasters to make decisions.

Australia's devastating drought is having a critical impact on the iconic platypus, a globally unique mammal, with increasing reports of rivers drying up and platypuses becoming stranded.

Platypuses were once considered widespread across the eastern Australian mainland and Tasmania, although not a lot is known about their distribution or abundance because of the species' secretive and nocturnal nature.

A team of scientists from the Research and Education Center "Functional Nanomaterials" of Kant Baltic State University works on the development of new prospective nanomaterials. Together with foreign colleagues they have recently discovered a method for synthesizing titanium oxide (Ti2O3) thin films. Some of the new materials are considerably different from their bulk analogs and show the required conductivity within a wider range of temperatures. In the future they may be used to create effective catalysts that would not depend on temperature.

Arctic sea ice cannot "quickly bounce back" if climate change causes it to melt, new research suggests.

A team of scientists led by the University of Exeter used the shells of quahog clams, which can live for hundreds of years, and climate models to discover how Arctic sea ice has changed over the last 1,000 years.

They found sea ice coverage shifts over timescales of decades to centuries - so shrinking ice cannot be expected to return rapidly if climate change is slowed or reversed.

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- During the past 20 years, insecticides applied to U.S. agricultural landscapes have become significantly more toxic -- over 120-fold in some midwestern states -- to honey bees when ingested, according to a team of researchers, who identified rising neonicotinoid seed treatments in corn and soy as the primary driver of this change. The study is the first to characterize the geographic patterns of insecticide toxicity to bees and reveal specific areas of the country where mitigation and conservation efforts could be focused.

Allegedly, they should not exist in the brain, the so-called precapillary sphincters - a kind of squeezing 'muscle clamp' between the larger and smaller vessels of the bloodstream.

Nevertheless, Assistant Professor Søren Grubb from the Department of Neuroscience at the University of Copenhagen has indeed shown the sphincters in mice.

'In the early '10s, a Japanese review study concluded that there was no evidence that pre-capillary sphincters should exist in the heart, brain and muscular connective tissue,' he says and continues:

The discovery last year of the first nickel oxide material that shows clear signs of superconductivity set off a race by scientists around the world to find out more. The crystal structure of the material is similar to copper oxides, or cuprates, which hold the world record for conducting electricity with no loss at relatively high temperatures and normal pressures. But do its electrons behave in the same way?

River flow is reduced in areas where forests have been planted and does not recover over time, a new study has shown. Rivers in some regions can completely disappear within a decade. This highlights the need to consider the impact on regional water availability, as well as the wider climate benefit, of tree-planting plans.

Squirrels that strongly favour their left or right side are less good at learning, new research suggests.

Just as humans are usually left- or right-handed, many animals favour one side of their body for certain tasks.

The strength of this preference varies, with some individuals happy to use either side, while others strongly favour one side (known as being strongly "lateralised").

What the global climate emergency has in store may vary from one back yard to the next, particularly in the tropics where microclimates, geography and land-use practices shift dramatically over small areas. This has major implications for adaptation strategies at local levels and requires trustworthy, high-resolution data on plausible future climate scenarios.

DURHAM, N.C. -- Few singers reach their sunset years with the same voice they had in younger days. Singing sparrows are no different. Duke University-led research reveals that elderly swamp sparrows don't sound quite like they used to -- nor do they strike the same fear in other males who may be listening in.

Humans are remarkably good at guessing a person's age just by hearing their voice. But this is the first time the phenomenon has been demonstrated in wild animals, said Duke biology professor and study co-author Steve Nowicki.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean it gathered water vapor data that provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Tino.

Tropical Cyclone Tino formed near Fiji in the Southern Pacific Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite provided meteorologists with a look at the water vapor content of the storm showing potential for heavy rain.

America's prison populations are disproportionately filled with people of color, but prosecutors' biases toward defendants' race and class may not be the primary cause for those disparities, new research from the University of Arizona suggests.

A positive psychology program created by researchers at Queen Mary University of London focuses on promoting wellbeing in refugee children. It is unusual in that it focuses on promoting positive outcomes, rather than addressing war trauma exposure.

This is the first positive psychology-based intervention to be systematically evaluated for use with refugee children.

"Save the rainforests" is a snappy slogan, but it doesn't tell the full story of how complicated it is to do just that. Before conservationists can even begin restoring habitats and advocating for laws that protect land from poachers and loggers, scientists need to figure out what's living, what's dying, and which patterns explain why. Tackling these questions--in other words, finding out what drives a region's biodiversity--is no small task.