Culture

A Chinese research team has developed an advanced imaging technique to achieve super-resolution microscopy at unprecedented speeds and with many fewer images. The new method should make it possible to capture processes in living cells at speeds not previously possible.

Chinese scientists recently developed a flexible electronic skin (e-skin) capable of self-powered neural stimulation and inducing a neural response. The technology will be useful in characterizing synaptic plasticity.

The research was conducted by Dr. ZHAN Yang's group from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Drs. XUE Xinyu and ZHANG Yan from the University of Electronic Science and Technology.

PORTLAND, Ore. - A study of outpatient visits to health care providers in the United States during a one-year period suggests 18 percent of antibiotic prescriptions were written without a documented reason for doing so.

The findings, published today in BMJ, are important because they shed greater light on the frequency of antibiotic misuse outside of hospitals and other inpatient care facilities.

According to the CDC, the suicide rate for individuals 10-24 years old has increased 56% between 2007 and 2017. In comparison to the general population, more than half of people experiencing homelessness have had thoughts of suicide or have attempted suicide, the National Health Care for the Homeless Council reported.

Phebe Vayanos, assistant professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering and Computer Science at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering has been enlisting the help of a powerful ally -artificial intelligence- to help mitigate the risk of suicide.

Today many agricultural plants are grown using hydroponics, i.e. in artificial soilless environments. The source of nutrients for the plants is a special substrate surrounding their roots. Thanks to this method agriculturists can harvest the plants all year round and control and adjust the conditions of cultivation. One of such conditions is the ratio of micro- and macroelements in the substrate. Any changes in its composition may affect the metabolism and levels of biologically active substances that determine the nutritional qualities of plants.

For 50 years, the theory of the "descended larynx" has stated that before speech can emerge, the larynx must be in a low position to produce differentiated vowels. Monkeys, which have a vocal tract anatomy that resembles that of humans in the essential articulators (tongue, jaw, lips) but with a higher larynx, could not produce differentiated vocalizations.

Linguist Dave Kush at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's Department of Language and Literature has been studying a phenomenon in which Norwegian, Swedish and Danish stand out.

This language peculiarity has to do with the order of words, or the syntax. The basic point of the study is to better understand the grammatical building blocks in our brain.

Moving the most important word to the beginning of a sentence is called topicalization. The first word acts as a "heading" for the rest of the sentence.

The evolution of human dance has been studied by psychologists in chimpanzees

Researchers from the University of Warwick, Durham University and Free University of Brussels found two chimpanzees performed a duo dance-like behaviour, similar to a conga-line

Behaviours displayed by the chimpanzees forces an interest in the evolution of dance as humans are no longer the only ape species where it takes two individuals to tango.

Bowling Green, Ohio December 12, 2019 - SIOP publishes white paper that explores how to promote your overseas workers' productivity and well-being.

The SIOP White Paper series organizes and summarizes important and timely topics in I-O psychology. The newest white paper, "Culture and Overseas Work: Expectations, Preparations, Coping; Return," focuses on the well-being of expatriates.

COLUMBUS, Ohio - The out-of-pocket financial burden for insured working Americans is substantial and growing - especially when it comes to out-of-network, non-emergency hospital care, a new study has found.

Researchers at The Ohio State University analyzed claims from more than 22 million enrollees in private insurance plans and found that out-of-pocket costs for non-emergency out-of-network hospital care nearly doubled in five years.

Most people who experience severe trauma recover their health. But 23 percent develop PTSD, a difficult-to-treat illness that combines intrusive thoughts about the trauma, avoidance of reminders of it, low mood and an exaggerated startle reaction. Which trauma victims will develop the disorder and which will be spared is not well understood.

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A virus that afflicts cattle that was first discovered in Japan in 2003 has made its way to the U.S., researchers report in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Bovine kobuvirus is fairly new to science, so its ill effects are not fully understood. It belongs to a family of viruses known as Picornaviridae, which includes Rhinovirus, a source of head colds and sinus infections in humans; and Poliovirus, which causes polio.

LEBANON, NH - High-fat diets and obesity have been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer and worsen outcomes and prognosis of breast cancer patients. A team of researchers from Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center led by William Kinlaw III, MD, sought to understand how fat from the diet might influence breast cancer cells. In their new study, they found that in addition to making new fat to fuel proliferation, breast cancer cells can take up large quantities of fat derived from the lipid-rich particles that circulate in the bloodstream.

When astronomers see something in the universe that at first glance seems like one-of-a-kind, it's bound to stir up a lot of excitement and attention. Enter comet 2I/Borisov. This mysterious visitor from the depths of space is the first identified comet to arrive here from another star. We don't know from where or when the comet started heading toward our Sun, but it won't hang around for long. The Sun's gravity is slightly deflecting its trajectory, but can't capture it because of the shape of its orbit and high velocity of about 100,000 miles per hour.