Culture

UC San Francisco scientists have designed a large-scale screen that efficiently identifies drugs that are potent cancer-killers when combined, but only weakly effective when used alone. Using this technique, the researchers eradicated a devastating blood cancer and certain solid tumor cells by jointly administering drugs that are only partially effective when used as single-agent therapies.

People who engage in high-intensity interval training are at greater risk for injury, especially in the knees and shoulders, a Rutgers study found.

These workouts, which combine aerobic exercising, weight lifting and calisthenics at maximum capacity, followed by periods of recovery, have been growing in popularity over the past decade, driven by the efficiency of the exercise to deliver fitness goals in less time.

Orlando, Fla. (April 8, 2019) - The Dusky Arion slug produces a defensive glue that fouls the mouthparts of any would-be predator. Two new studies reveal more about how this glue achieves its strong sticking power and flexibility, insights that could be used to create better medical adhesives.

WASHINGTON -- When people feel that their own good impressions of themselves are at risk, they may try to increase their savings, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

"People who are insecure about their lives and the broader world save as a means of securing their future in anticipation of a possible emergency," said Yael Steinhart, PhD, of Tel-Aviv University and lead author of the study.

The findings were published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

Shark and ray species commonly caught in the Mediterranean and Black seas are not being reported in official statistics, new research from the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia shows.

A new study published in Marine Policy reveals that 97 per cent of the sharks and rays caught and brought to market domestically by fleets from the European, North African and Middle Eastern countries that surround these seas are not reported by species.

For the vast majority of cancer drugs experiencing shortages over a seven-year period, a new USC research study found no statistically significant effect of shortages on chemotherapy treatment.

"These findings are surprising in light of the substantial media and policy attention that the cancer drug shortage problem has garnered," said Mireille Jacobson, study coauthor and associate professor of gerontology at the USC Leonard Davis School and the Schaeffer Center for Health Policy & Economics.

Orlando, Fla. (April 7, 2019)--A new study suggests that sunscreen protects the skin's blood vessel function from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure by protecting dilation of the blood vessels. Perspiration on the skin may also provide protection to the skin's blood vessels from sun damage. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.

Orlando, Fla. (April 7, 2019) - Research conducted in mice suggests the food additive tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ)--found in many common products from frozen meat to crackers and fried foods--suppresses the immune response the body mounts when fighting the flu. In addition to increasing the severity of flu symptoms, the study found evidence that tBHQ exposure could reduce the effectiveness of the flu vaccine through its effects on T cells, a vital component of the immune system.

Orlando, Fla. (April 6, 2019) - An estimated six to 15 million people in the U.S. are children born of a pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia. New research performed in rats reveals that treating preeclampsia with sildenafil citrate (Viagra) may help protect the cardiovascular health of the offspring.

Preeclampsia occurs when women with otherwise normal blood pressure experience elevated blood pressure during pregnancy. Children of women with preeclampsia during pregnancy have higher blood pressure during childhood and almost double the risk of stroke later in life.

Blood pressure and stroke risk increase steadily with increasing alcohol intake, and previous claims that 1-2 alcoholic drinks a day might protect against stroke are dismissed by new evidence from a genetic study involving 160,000 adults.