Culture

Drawing from almost 200 scientific studies on workplace meetings, a team of psychological scientists provides recommendations for making the most out of meetings before they start, as they're happening, and after they've concluded.

Potatoes, native to South America, became an agricultural crop thousands of years ago in the Andean highlands of Peru. And just as the ancient Andean people turned wild tubers into the domesticated potato, the potato may have altered the genomes of the Andeans who made it a staple of their diet.

Science Advances published the findings. DNA analyses show that ancient populations of the Peruvian highlands adapted to the introduction of agriculture and an extreme, high-altitude environment in ways distinct from other global populations.

Repetition is the best method for memorization, for neurons themselves. This is the principle behind what neurobiologists call sequence reactivations: during sleep, neurons in the hippocampus related to a task activate very quickly in turn in a precise order, which consolidates the memory of this task. Sequence reactivations are fundamental for long-term memorization and for exchanges between the hippocampus and the rest of the brain. These are only present at rest so they appear after initial neuron activity, which implies that they "memorize" the order they should turn on in.

For bees, being social is everything.

Whether it's foraging for food, caring for the young, using their bodies to generate heat or to fan the nest, or building and repairing nests, a bee colony does just about everything as a single unit.

While recent studies have suggested exposure to pesticides could have impacts on foraging behavior, a new study, led by James Crall, has shown that those effects may be just the tip of the iceberg.

New research from the University of Washington and the University of Massachusetts - Amherst looks at how the most common cause of sneezing and sniffling in North America is likely to shift under climate change.

A recent study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE finds that common ragweed will expand its range northward as the climate warms, reaching places including New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, while retreating from some current hot spots.

A geology professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, has discovered that a set of 28 footprints left behind by a reptile-like creature 310 million years ago, are the oldest ever to be found in Grand Canyon National Park.

The fossil trackway covers a fallen boulder that now rests along the Bright Angel Trail in the national park. Rowland presented his findings at the recent annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.

An enzyme known to help our liver get rid of ammonia also appears to be good at protecting our retina, scientists report.

Our retina, which captures light and converts it into neural signals that go to the brain so we can see, can be damaged or destroyed by conditions that reduce blood flow like diabetes, glaucoma or hypertension.

Hip replacement surgery is highly successful in relieving pain, restoring mobility and improving quality of life. More than 330,000 procedures are performed each year in the United States, and that number is expected to almost double by the year 2030.

A pioneering technique designed to spot differences between immune cells in tumours could speed the development of cancer treatments, research suggests.

Scientists say the approach could be used to help doctors choose the best treatments for individual patients and predict which tumours are likely to respond to a particular therapy.

Statins have been linked with muscle pain and other musculoskeletal adverse events (MAEs) in some patients. A new Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study has examined the timing of MAEs that develop during statin therapy and determined whether concomitant drugs used concurrently with statin therapy shifts the timing of MAEs.