Culture

Democratic governance is linked with declines in cardiovascular disease mortality and road deaths, as well as increases in government health spending

Life expectancy improved faster in countries that transitioned to democracy between 1970 and 2015 compared to those that did not--increasing by an average of 3% after 10 years

Democracy appears to play a bigger part in health outcomes than a country's GDP--accounting for about 25% of the reductions in deaths from cardiovascular disease and transport injuries over time

"A healthy community requires healthy soil." This idea spurred a consortium of researchers, farmers, and community garden practitioners to dive into the challenges--and opportunities--of urban agriculture. Their efforts, now in a second year, may highlight how urban soil can be a resource for human and environmental health.

AUGUSTA, Ga. (March 13, 2019) - Our bodies are continuously concocting specific antibodies to thwart invaders like a virus or even pollen, and scientists have new information about how the essential production gets fired up and keeps up.

It's a key protective mechanism that the scientists want to better understand with the long-term goal of manipulating it to help keep us well, says Dr. Nagendra Singh, immunologist in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.

BEER-SHEVA, ISRAEL...March 13, 2019 -An international team of researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, the University of Oxford and University of Birmingham have found that internet search patterns and rhythms reflect seasonal interest in plants and animals.

This surprise finding, published in PLoS Biology, suggests new ways to monitor changes in the world's biodiversity based on monitoring internet searches and may provide a roadmap for conservation around the world.

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology teamed up with colleagues from the U.S. and Switzerland and returned the state of a quantum computer a fraction of a second into the past. They also calculated the probability that an electron in empty interstellar space will spontaneously travel back into its recent past. The study comes out March 13 in Scientific Reports.

MISSOULA - New University of Montana research suggests climate change makes it increasingly difficult for tree seedlings to regenerate following wildfires in low-elevation forests, which could contribute to abrupt forest loss.

The study, "Wildfires and Climate Change Push Low-elevation Forests Across a Critical Climate Threshold for Tree Regeneration," was published March 11 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and is available online at http://bit.ly/2HeZc8t.

EAST LANSING, Mich. - When it comes to advancing social status, it's not what you know, it's who you know - for humans and spotted hyenas alike.

In a new study published in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Michigan State University scientists show that hyenas that form strong coalitions can gain social status, which can have lasting benefits over many generations.

Across North America, coyotes are moving into urban environments, and regardless of how they feel about it, urban residents are having to get used to some new animal neighbors. A big question for wildlife researchers is how coyotes habituate to humans, which can potentially lead to conflict.

A study led by a University of Washington Tacoma faculty member, recently published in Ecology and Evolution, suggests coyotes can habituate to humans quickly and that habituated parents pass this fearlessness on to their offspring.

ITHACA, N.Y. - It's not whether you win or lose; it's how hard the robot is working.

A Cornell University-led team has found that when robots are beating humans in contests for cash prizes, people consider themselves less competent and expend slightly less effort - and they tend to dislike the robots.

A new study has found that frequent visits to the bathroom at night could cost the US economy $44.4 billion a year. According to researchers at the not-for-profit research organisation RAND Europe, waking up more than twice a night due to nocturia, a health condition that affects the lower urinary tract, can have a detrimental effect on a person's wellbeing and productivity at work, which in turn has an impact on a country's GDP.