Tech

Following a premature birth it is important that the parents and the infant quickly establish a good relationship. Researchers at Linköping University have studied the relationship between mothers and infants who have continuous skin-to-skin contact during the entire period from birth to discharge from the hospital. The results show that continuous skin-to-skin contact does not lead to better interaction between the mother and the infant. The study is published in the scientific journal Advances in Neonatal Care.

Mammals sweat to regulate body temperature, and researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China are exploring whether our phones could do the same. In a study published January 22 in the journal Joule, the authors present a coating for electronics that releases water vapor to dissipate heat from running devices--a new thermal management method that could prevent electronics from overheating and keep them cooler compared to existing strategies.

WASHINGTON--Blood tests could replace menstrual periods as a gauge for when a women is nearing menopause, according to new research published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

It's a leading research strategy for eliminating HIV from the body: "shock and kill." The idea is to activate the dormant virus from within the immune cells where it hides, then eliminate it. One obstacle has been finding a safe way to wake up the virus.

In two complementary Nature papers, researchers now report that they have come closer to that goal. The papers are from researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, funded by the National Institutes of Health.

An international team led by Harvard Medical School scientists has produced the first genome-wide ancient human DNA sequences from west and central Africa.

The data, recovered from four individuals buried at an iconic archaeological site in Cameroon between 3,000 and 8,000 years ago, enhance our understanding of the deep ancestral relationships among populations in sub-Saharan Africa, which remains the region of greatest human diversity today.

ANN ARBOR--Recycled and aged human urine can be used as a fertilizer with low risks of transferring antibiotic resistant DNA to the environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan.

It's a key finding in efforts to identify more sustainable alternatives to widely used fertilizers that contribute to water pollution. Their high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus can spur the growth of algae, which can threaten our sources of drinking water.

A pilot study conducted by INRS researchers highlights the effect of chemotherapy on male fertility before and after puberty.

"It is often thought that cancer treatments for prepubescent boys will have no effect on their fertility because their testicles would be "dormant". But in fact, the prepubertal testis are not immune to chemotherapy that affects dividing cells and it is now well recognized that there can be long-term effects," explains Géraldine Delbès, a professor at the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) in Laval.

An international team of researchers from ITMO University, the Australian National University, and Korea University have experimentally trapped an electromagnetic wave in a gallium arsenide nanoresonator a few hundred nanometers in size for a record-breaking time. Earlier attempts to trap light for such a long time have only been successful with much larger resonators. In addition, the researchers have provided experimental proof that this resonator may be used as a basis for an efficient light frequency nanoconverter.

A team of researchers at CHU Sainte-Justine and Université de Montréal has shed light on the mechanisms that underlie a rare genetic condition by creating the first cellular model of the disease. The study's findings were published today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare hereditary condition that affects one in every 217,000 people worldwide and typically strikes patients at an early age.

NEW YORK, January 21, 2020- Childhood obesity is a growing problem in the United States. For children, obesity is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) at or above the 95th percentile, and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 18.5% of children between the ages of 2 and 19 meet this criteria.

SAN ANTONIO -- Jan. 22, 2020 -- A Southwest Research Institute team developed a new geochemical model that reveals that carbon dioxide (CO2) from within Enceladus, an ocean-harboring moon of Saturn, may be controlled by chemical reactions at its seafloor. Studying the plume of gases and frozen sea spray released through cracks in the moon's icy surface suggests an interior more complex than previously thought.

Researchers at Tohoku University have developed a new type of smart contact lenses that can prevent dry eyes. The self-moisturising system, which is described in the journal Advanced Materials Technologies, maintains a layer of fluid between the contact lens and the eye using a novel mechanism.

Smart contact lenses are wearable devices that could accelerate vision beyond natural human capabilities. They are being developed for a wide range of applications from non-invasive monitoring to vision correction to augmented reality display.

Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This finding could open a new dimension in the application of artificial machines fabricated from biomolecular motors and other proteins.

New findings from University of Exeter researchers reveal how bacterial immune systems can be harmful for their hosts and explain why they are not found in many bacteria.

CRISPR-Cas is an immune system that protects bacteria against infection by viruses (called phages).

The system works by stealing a small piece of viral DNA and using this to target and destroy matching sections of virus genome during a future infection.

Targeting by CRISPR-Cas breaks down the virus genome, meaning that new copies of the virus cannot be made.

Researchers of Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) in collaboration with colleagues from the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and a number of German scientific organizations, calculated previously unexplored effects in atoms. The results were published in the PHYSICAL REVIEW A, highlighted as an Editor's Choice article.