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Updated: 31 min 42 sec ago

Intermittent Fasting Fad May Increase Diabetes Risk

Jul 15 2018 - 14:07

Intermittent fasting - fasting every other day - is guaranteed to lose weight in the short term, because it's a crash diet. 

But like lots of other fad diets, the people selling books about it are basing their speculation on animal models and an unrealistic amount of optimism. In biological reality, intermittent fasting impairs the action of sugar-regulating hormone, insulin, which may increase diabetes risk.

Findings presented in the spring at at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, suggest that fasting-based diets may be associated with long-term health risks and careful consideration should be made before starting this fad program - or any fad diet. Energy balance is the only known way to lose weight.

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Categories: Science 2.0

Intermittent Fasting Fad May Increase Diabetes Risk

Jul 15 2018 - 14:07

Intermittent fasting - fasting every other day - is guaranteed to lose weight in the short term, because it's a crash diet. 

But like lots of other fad diets, the people selling books about it are basing their speculation on animal models and an unrealistic amount of optimism. In biological reality, intermittent fasting impairs the action of sugar-regulating hormone, insulin, which may increase diabetes risk.

Findings presented in the spring at at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, suggest that fasting-based diets may be associated with long-term health risks and careful consideration should be made before starting this fad program - or any fad diet. Energy balance is the only known way to lose weight.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Maybe The Oumuamua Asteroid Is Really A Comet

Jul 14 2018 - 10:07
The asteroid Oumuamua ("scout from the distant past" in Hawaiian) was discovered on October 19, 2017 by astronomers at thr Pan-STARRS1 survey when it came close to Earth's orbit, within the orbit of Mercury, about a month after its closest approach to the Sun It was called an asteroid - but it may be a comet.

Why the confusion? There are more data about its trajectory. Oumuamua was unlike any asteroid or comet observed before. It sped past the Sun, approaching from "above" the plabe of the planets on a highly inclined orbit, moving fast enough (70,800 miles per hour as of July 1, 2018) to escape the Sun's gravitational pull and eventually depart our Solar System.

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Maybe The Oumuamua Asteroid Is Really A Comet

Jul 14 2018 - 10:07
The asteroid Oumuamua ("scout from the distant past" in Hawaiian) was discovered on October 19, 2017 by astronomers at thr Pan-STARRS1 survey when it came close to Earth's orbit, within the orbit of Mercury, about a month after its closest approach to the Sun It was called an asteroid - but it may be a comet.

Why the confusion? There are more data about its trajectory. Oumuamua was unlike any asteroid or comet observed before. It sped past the Sun, approaching from "above" the plabe of the planets on a highly inclined orbit, moving fast enough (70,800 miles per hour as of July 1, 2018) to escape the Sun's gravitational pull and eventually depart our Solar System.

read more

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Multiple Barriers To Treatment For Opioid Users

Jul 13 2018 - 13:07
In 2016, more than 42,000 Americans died of an opioid-related overdose, which is alarming - but most of those deaths were not accidents by pain patients or suicides, they were recreational drug users.

There are numerous obstacles to making meaningful progress. For one, legitimate pain patients have become more stigmatized - government is blaming doctors and pharmacy rather than drug dealers - and that means people who want to kick their addiction are even more ostracized. 

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Multiple Barriers To Treatment For Opioid Users

Jul 13 2018 - 13:07
In 2016, more than 42,000 Americans died of an opioid-related overdose, which is alarming - but most of those deaths were not accidents by pain patients or suicides, they were recreational drug users.

There are numerous obstacles to making meaningful progress. For one, legitimate pain patients have become more stigmatized - government is blaming doctors and pharmacy rather than drug dealers - and that means people who want to kick their addiction are even more ostracized. 

read more

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Paleontology Challenge: Zombie Fossils

Jul 13 2018 - 09:07

A key part of palaeontology is reconstructing long-extinct creatures to understand what they were like when they were alive. Such knowledge allows us to answer fundamental questions about how they moved and interacted with their environment. How did they feed and reproduce? Which of today's organisms are they most like and most closely related to? 

It has challenges. The history of life can be distorted by the ways animals decompose and lose body parts as they decay - and the ways in which decayed bodies ultimately become fossilized. Like on-screen zombies in "The Walking Dead" that gradually deteriorate through time, fossils preserve only incomplete remains of the living body.

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Paleontology Challenge: Zombie Fossils

Jul 13 2018 - 09:07

A key part of palaeontology is reconstructing long-extinct creatures to understand what they were like when they were alive. Such knowledge allows us to answer fundamental questions about how they moved and interacted with their environment. How did they feed and reproduce? Which of today's organisms are they most like and most closely related to? 

It has challenges. The history of life can be distorted by the ways animals decompose and lose body parts as they decay - and the ways in which decayed bodies ultimately become fossilized. Like on-screen zombies in "The Walking Dead" that gradually deteriorate through time, fossils preserve only incomplete remains of the living body.

read more

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Sea Level Rise Threatens UK Coastal Wetlands By 2100

Jul 12 2018 - 18:07
A new analysis estimates that if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, sea-level rise will endanger coastal wetlands across the United Kingdom.

That conclusion was derived by estimating salt-marsh vulnerability using the geological record of past losses in response to sea-level change. Data from 800 salt-marsh soil cores showed that rising sea levels in the past led to increased waterlogging of the salt marshes in the region, killing the vegetation that protects them from erosion.

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Sea Level Rise Threatens UK Coastal Wetlands By 2100

Jul 12 2018 - 18:07
A new analysis estimates that if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, sea-level rise will endanger coastal wetlands across the United Kingdom.

That conclusion was derived by estimating salt-marsh vulnerability using the geological record of past losses in response to sea-level change. Data from 800 salt-marsh soil cores showed that rising sea levels in the past led to increased waterlogging of the salt marshes in the region, killing the vegetation that protects them from erosion.

read more

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Milky Way Galaxy 1 - 0 Sausage Galaxy

Jul 12 2018 - 15:07
A cosmic crash 8 billion to 10 billion years ago was a defining event in the early history of the Milky Way and reshaped the structure of our galaxy.

The Sausage Galaxy lost and the Milky Way won, fashioning both its inner bulge and its outer halo. The wreckage is all around us and the paths of the stars from the galactic merger earned them the moniker "the Gaia Sausage."

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Milky Way Galaxy 1 - 0 Sausage Galaxy

Jul 12 2018 - 15:07
A cosmic crash 8 billion to 10 billion years ago was a defining event in the early history of the Milky Way and reshaped the structure of our galaxy.

The Sausage Galaxy lost and the Milky Way won, fashioning both its inner bulge and its outer halo. The wreckage is all around us and the paths of the stars from the galactic merger earned them the moniker "the Gaia Sausage."

read more

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New Vaccines Instead Of Antibiotics As Approach To Treating Infectious Diseases

Jul 12 2018 - 11:07
Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is a major cause of diarrhea in developing countries, and responsible for at least 300,000 deaths a year, according to the World Health Organization.

Effective vaccines have not been developed, so patients infected are treated with antibiotics and supporting measures. The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has become a concern so the development of new treatment methods is ongoing.

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New Vaccines Instead Of Antibiotics As Approach To Treating Infectious Diseases

Jul 12 2018 - 11:07
Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is a major cause of diarrhea in developing countries, and responsible for at least 300,000 deaths a year, according to the World Health Organization.

Effective vaccines have not been developed, so patients infected are treated with antibiotics and supporting measures. The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has become a concern so the development of new treatment methods is ongoing.

read more

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Blood Thinners: Better Treatment Of Atrial Fibrillation Linked To Prevention Of 7,000 Strokes Annually

Jul 12 2018 - 10:07

Blood thinning drugs are preventing 7,000 strokes each year, according to an analysis of general practice records of five million patients from 2000 to 2016 to find out how many people have a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation and how many are receiving treatment to prevent strokes. 

Atrial fibrillation is the most common cause of an irregular heartbeat and five times increases the risk of stroke. To reduce the risk of stroke by around two thirds, patients with atrial fibrillation are given anticoagulant drugs to prevent blood clotting, such as warfarin. 

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Blood Thinners: Better Treatment Of Atrial Fibrillation Linked To Prevention Of 7,000 Strokes Annually

Jul 12 2018 - 10:07

Blood thinning drugs are preventing 7,000 strokes each year, according to an analysis of general practice records of five million patients from 2000 to 2016 to find out how many people have a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation and how many are receiving treatment to prevent strokes. 

Atrial fibrillation is the most common cause of an irregular heartbeat and five times increases the risk of stroke. To reduce the risk of stroke by around two thirds, patients with atrial fibrillation are given anticoagulant drugs to prevent blood clotting, such as warfarin. 

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RCW 38 Captured By The Very Large Telescope

Jul 12 2018 - 09:07
By using infrared wavelengths, the HAWK-I infrared imager mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile was able to capture this image of the star cluster RCW 38.

RCW 38 is over 5,00 light years away (look toward the constellation Vela) and is composed of several short-lived massive stars that will eventually supernovae, but also has some 8,000 other x-ray emitting objects.

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Categories: Science 2.0

RCW 38 Captured By The Very Large Telescope

Jul 12 2018 - 09:07
By using infrared wavelengths, the HAWK-I infrared imager mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile was able to capture this image of the star cluster RCW 38.

RCW 38 is over 5,00 light years away (look toward the constellation Vela) and is composed of several short-lived massive stars that will eventually supernovae, but also has some 8,000 other x-ray emitting objects.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Alvogen - This Company Doesn't Want Government Buying Its Drugs

Jul 11 2018 - 15:07
In Ely, about 250 north of Las Vegas, Nevada is scheduled to hold its first execution in 12 years.

Nothing controversial about that, because in 2002 Scott Dozier murdered Jeremiah Miller after he traveled to Las Vegas where Dozier had promised to help him make methamphetamine. Dozier dumped him in a trash bin, three years later killed at least one other person, and has been on "death row" since 2007.  And nothing controversial about Dozier wanting to die rather than spend the rest of his life in prison.

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Categories: Science 2.0

Alvogen - This Company Doesn't Want Government Buying Its Drugs

Jul 11 2018 - 15:07
In Ely, about 250 north of Las Vegas, Nevada is scheduled to hold its first execution in 12 years.

Nothing controversial about that, because in 2002 Scott Dozier murdered Jeremiah Miller after he traveled to Las Vegas where Dozier had promised to help him make methamphetamine. Dozier dumped him in a trash bin, three years later killed at least one other person, and has been on "death row" since 2007.  And nothing controversial about Dozier wanting to die rather than spend the rest of his life in prison.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0