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Updated: 37 min 18 sec ago

More Efficient Solar Panels On The Horizon

Apr 30 2021 - 16:04
Horizon

We've all seen how helpful solar panels are in renewable energy. From a consumer perspective, solar power is still an up-and-coming challenger to the existing fossil fuel infrastructure that most power generation systems take advantage of. The University of Michigan estimates that as little as 1.8% of US power generation in 2019 came from solar sources. Part of the reason this number is so low is why more commercial users haven't tapped into the technology. It makes little sense to go to the expense of installing a solar generation system based on the returns that it offers. However, that may soon change, based on new advances in technology.

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Winds Will Take Out The Larsen C Ice Shelf Before Climate Change Can

Apr 29 2021 - 18:04
Antarctica’s fourth largest ice shelf, the Larsen C Ice Shelf located on the Antarctic Peninsula, risks collapse due to mountain winds, according to a recent presentation at annual meeting of the European Geophysical Union.

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Latte Nonsense: No, Your Genes Do Not Tell You How Much Coffee To Drink

Apr 29 2021 - 14:04
When 23andMe was in its most ridiculous phase of existence, the co-founder was telling FDA to talk to the hand while she assumed campaign donations to members of Congress would exempt them from being told to stop lying about their tests allowing consumers to “take steps toward mitigating serious diseases” like breast cancer.

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Acceleron Makes History By Getting FDA's First Notice Of Noncompliance For Not Posting Results To ClinicalTrials.Gov

Apr 28 2021 - 18:04
The ClinicalTrials.gov data bank, managed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Library of Medicine, requires trial sponsors to register applicable clinical trials within 21 days after the first human subject is enrolled and submit certain summary results information for those trials, generally no later than one year after the study’s completion date unless a deadline extension is obtained.

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Gauging The Environmental Impact Of NFTs

Apr 28 2021 - 12:04
Artwork is one of the newest purchasable commodities on the crypto market, thanks to a new technology known as non-fungible tokens (NFTs). NPR informs us that an NFT is a crypto token that isn't interchangeable but is tied to a specific commodity. The easiest way to think about them is an analog to how they're being used. For the first time in its history, blockchains can be used to hold and trade collectibles. Yet, the trade of these collectible tokens brings with it some alarming environmental concerns.

Tons of Power Consumption

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New Social Distancing Guidelines For The Partially Vaccinated

Apr 27 2021 - 18:04
The Six Foot Rule is only a rule in a 'rule of thumb' way; it's okay for an estimate but you use a real ruler to build a house. 

Analyses instead show that the most important things are a mix of masks and ventilation. What about outdoors where ventilation is terrific? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  has now relaxed its guidelines and are in line with what the science says; namely that unless you're in a protest unmasked, you'll be fine. And the Biden administration wants to use that to promote vaccines as well.

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Feel Heavy? There Are 10,000,000 Pounds Of Space Dust Falling On Us Each Year

Apr 27 2021 - 16:04
About 23,000,000 years ago, something hit the giant Asteroid 4 Vesta(1) some 120,000,000 miles away and the impact sent huge rocks into space. In 2018, one such meteorite from that time hit Botswana.

It was not unique. Over 30 percent of such Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenites (HED) meteorites that hit Earth year come from just the impact that formed the Antonia crater on Vesta. And then there is everything else happening outside our atmosphere piling on.

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Motopi Pan Meteorite That Hit Botswana Came From The Giant Asteroid Vesta

Apr 26 2021 - 16:04
Thanks to cosmic rays that created radioactive isotopes while it was in space, an asteroid on an impact trajectory with Earth On June 2, 2018 was detected before it arrived. 

Thanks to the isotopes in those fragments, researchers determined that 2018 LA, called such by the University of Arizona's Catalina Sky Survey as part of NASA's Planetary Defense program, was a solid rock about 1.5 m in size, which reflected about 25 percent of sunlight.

Eight hours later, a video camera in South Africa recorded a bright fireball over Botswana and the hunt was on for surviving meteorites deep inside the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. The first meteorite they found 18 grams and about 3 cm in size.

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Will Some Antibiotics Prevent The Entry Of SARS-CoV-2 Into Cells?

Apr 26 2021 - 14:04
Antibiotics won't help with COVID-19 because the disease is not caused by bacteria but instead a virus. However, a new study finds that some antibiotics can prevent the entry of the SARS-CoV-2 virus into cells. The Drug Design and Molecular Topology Unit group of the University of Valencia found that certain macrolide antibiotics like clarithromycin and azithromycin (used in respiratory tract infections) does just that.

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6-Foot Rule Does Little To Prevent COVID-19 Exposure

Apr 26 2021 - 13:04
There were a lot of rules introduced during the COVID-19 pandemic that originated during late 2019 in Wuhan, China. Some were pretty Draconian. China welded the homes of people shut and destroyed 16,000 coronavirus samples at the world's largest coronavirus lab nearby.  Some were pointless, like everyone carrying Clorox wipes around.  Most were less intrusive and at least somewhat helpful; wear a mask, stay six feet apart.

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Did Time Pass More Slowly During The COVID-19 Lockdown? You're Not Alone

Apr 26 2021 - 11:04
As a child, you probably thought a week took forever and parents certainly thought days crept by after having an infant.

"Time flies when you are having fun" and COVID-19 quarantines and lockdowns were not fun.

A new study also finds what psychologists warned about; the effects on those with depression issues could be even worse. Unlike a new job or moving to a new place, where time also 'seems' to slow down, the new paper found that distortions to the passage of time were also present later into the global pandemic.

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Today Is Hubble's 31st Birthday, Let's Celebrate By Enjoying AG Carinae On The Edge Of Destruction

Apr 24 2021 - 06:04
On April 24th, 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope was launched, and though it had bumpy childhood once the problems were fixed it has well exceeded its mission expectancy. A good thing too. The James Webb Space Telescope that was supposed to replace it 13 years and billions of dollars ago still hasn't launched, and when it eventually does, if things don't work, no space shuttle can reach it.

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Is The Red Sea Actually An Ocean?

Apr 23 2021 - 15:04
The Red Sea is about 1000 miles long and at most just over 170 miles wide. The Greeks called it a sea but they also called the Persian Gulf a sea.

It may instead be an ocean, because an ocean basin exists between Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The Greeks did not know that and the problem in knowing now is that the oceanic crust along the narrow, north-south aligned rift is widely buried under a thick blanket of salt and sediments, which complicates direct investigations.

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An Interview By APPEC

Apr 23 2021 - 12:04
A few weeks ago I was interviewed by Katrin Link for APPEC, the Astro-Particle Physics European Consortium. APPEC is a consortium of 19 funding agencies, national government institutions, and institutes from 17 European countries, which is responsible for coordinating and funding national research efforts in astroparticle physics. 

The interview stems from the help that the JENAA group (a joint effort of APPEC, NuPECC and ECFA) is trying to offer to the research plan of the MODE collaboration, a group of physicists and computer scientists for which I am serving as the scientific coordinator.





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AI Handwriting Analysis Yields Clues To Authors Of A Dead Seas Scrolls Manuscript

Apr 22 2021 - 17:04
In 1946, with World War II over, archaeologists got back to work and over 10 years found discarded Hebrew Bible manuscripts in 12 Ein Feshkha Caves near the Dead Sea in the West Bank. Fragments o these "Dead Sea Scrolls" include the Apocrypha, except for the Book of Esther, which may not have survived over time.

No one knows who printed most older works, for the Christian Bible it was anonymous monks, and the Dead Sea Scrolls also contain no attribution, but there has been speculation about who may have written them. Some sought to at least connect them by handwriting.

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People Who Try Drone Delivery Love It

Apr 22 2021 - 11:04
In 2019, Christiansburg, Virginia's 22,000 residents became the first first place in the U.S. to have a residential drone delivery service.

Yellow-winged drones with small cardboard boxes owned by Wing, a company owned by Alphabet (basically, Google) are now one of numerous trial services operating today. But regulations for giant planes full of fuel are not ready for delivery of the future, and the only way to make government get ready is public interest. Without proactive guidelines, the public will be stuck with activists doing to drones what they did to agriculture and cell phones.

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Video Games Are Bigger Than Movies And Music Combined - And Surveys Show That Gap May Widen

Apr 20 2021 - 21:04
A recent Deloitte survey found that the already moribund film industry has even more reason to worry; young people don't care.

You may not realize it, but video games are already 10X the revenue of films and 3X music.

And among Generation Z, only 10 percent want to watch a TV show or a film. Compare that to 26 percent who want to play a video game. In between are 14 percent who listen to music, 12 percent wander around the internet and 11 percent spend their time on social media. Among those born between 1983-1996 (nee millennials) Movies and TV still rule.

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Should The Biden Administration Ban Menthol Cigarettes To Protect Black Americans?

Apr 20 2021 - 14:04
Unidentified sources made their way into the Wall Street Journal a short while ago and by stating that the Biden administration was going to ban menthol cigarettes the article caused tobacco stocks to plummet.FDA has until the end of the month to do what the President wants, it was said.

It's entirely believable but what is interesting is the new reason for the ban; the government has pivoted from claiming menthol cigarettes "target" people of color to instead claiming they are used by children.

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Is The Cure Worse Than The Disease? In The COVID-19 Public Health Versus Jobs Debate, The Same People Suffer

Apr 20 2021 - 07:04

Throughout the pandemic, millions of Americans wondered: “Is the cure worse than the disease?”

The question implies a trade-off between “the cure,” in the form of economic shutdowns, and “the disease,” COVID-19. This debate dominated headlines in the first months of the pandemic. More than a year later, it continues to be a partisan lighting rod.

But our research shows that mortality during the pandemic in America has never fit the narrative that pits economic shutdowns against COVID-19.

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This Malaria Preventing Mosquito Is Not A GMO But Is A Science Boost For Nature - Will Activists Want To Block It?

Apr 20 2021 - 07:04
Mosquitoes like Aedes aegypti don't have any value ecologically. If Thanos snapped them out of existence tomorrow there is nothing they do that won't immediately be taken up by 3,000 other mosquito species, not to mention 25,000 bee species when it comes to pollination.

The only thing they are great at is killing people; by being a leading source of vector-borne dengue disease. Not far behind is Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, which carry malaria. Malaria kills nearly as many people each year as COVID-19 did in 2020 but there is no Warp Speed program to keep poor people in developing nations from dying. Environmental activists (overwhelmingly white and wealthy) instead spend $2 billion a year scaring people of color in other countries about science.

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