Brain

ANN ARBOR, MI - A curled-up cat, a tail-wagging dog, a chirping parakeet or even a serene goldfish may help older adults cope with mental and physical health issues, according to a new national poll.

While pets come with benefits, they can also bring concerns, and some people may even put their animals' needs ahead of their own health, the poll finds.

Hamilton, ON (April 1, 2019) - The legalization of medical assistance in dying (MAID) in Canada has resulted in some people choosing to donate their bodies to anatomy programs, but it has raised profound ethical issues, says McMaster University's head of anatomy.

Bruce Wainman, director of the Education Program in Anatomy at McMaster, said the anatomical scientist community needs to establish guidelines around these donations.

AURORA, Colo. (April 1, 2019) - While women outnumber men as Ob/Gyn practitioners, they still make significantly less money and the pay gap extends to subspecialties like reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI), according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

ATLANTA -- Adding the investigational MET inhibitor savolitinib to the EGFR inhibitor osimertinib (Tagrisso) yielded clinical responses in patients who had EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that had developed resistance to prior EGFR-targeted therapies through MET-gene amplification, according to interim results from two expansion cohorts of the phase Ib clinical trial TATTON, presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.

A new study published in the April 2019 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) investigates the safety of uterine artery embolization (UAE) for symptomatic leiomyomas in patients with various autoimmune diseases.

Researchers show that how well parents or guardians support millennials' psychological needs prior to their transition to college is an important predictor of their psychological well-being as they adapt to college life.

Children are more likely to suffer Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) if they think their reaction to traumatic events is not 'normal' - according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

While most children recover well after a traumatic event, some go on to develop PTSD that may stay with them for months, years, or even into adulthood.

A new study, published today, reveals that children begin down this route when they have trouble processing their trauma and perceive their symptoms as being a sign that something is seriously wrong.

Indigenous peoples in Canada have high rates of psychological distress, suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts, and these mental health issues are linked to income inequalities, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Suicide is a major cause of death among First Nations, Métis and Inuit people, with rates 2 to 3 times higher than in non-Indigenous Canadians.

FINDINGS

A study has found that out-of-pocket health care spending and medical debt are substantially higher when adults have a history of adverse childhood experiences. The study showed that household medical costs were 30 percent higher, and the likelihood of medical debt was doubled, when an adult had lived through three or more adverse experiences during childhood.

BACKGROUND

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found that type IgG antibodies play an unexpected role in atherosclerosis. A study on mice shows that the antibodies stabilise the plaque that accumulates on the artery walls, which reduces the risk of it rupturing and causing a blood clot. It is hoped that the results, which are published in the journal Circulation, will eventually lead to improved therapies.