Science 2.0

Subscribe to Science 2.0 feed
Science 2.0® - Science for the next 2,000 years, Non-profit, non-partisan, independent.
Updated: 18 min 19 sec ago

There Is Now No Racial Disparity In Lung Cancer Incidence - Except For White Women

Aug 24 2020 - 10:08
Historically, lung cancer incidence rates have been higher in Black people than White people among men of all ages and among younger women, likely reflecting historically higher smoking rates in Black adults.

That is no longer the case, and in women the trend has even reversed.

That is a big win for science and health nonprofit groups like ours, which have warned about the perils of smoking for our entire existence.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

IBD: How A Class Of Killer T Cells Goes Rogue

Aug 23 2020 - 15:08

Between 6 and 8 million people worldwide suffer from inflammatory bowel disease, a group of chronic intestinal disorders that can cause belly pain, urgent and frequent bowel movements, bloody stools and weight loss. New research suggests that a malfunctioning member of the patient’s own immune system called a killer T cell may be one of the culprits. This discovery may provide a new target for IBD medicines.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

82% Of Baby Boomers Are Experienced Enough Not To Trust Russia’s ‘Sputnik V’ COVID-19 Vaccine Claims

Aug 21 2020 - 11:08
Only 16 percent of Americans believe that Russia leapfrogged American scientists and successfully created a viable COVID-19 in a recent survey. They may be the same 16 percent who believe Russian propaganda sites like Russia Today and Sputnik when it comes to food: that Russia became the world leader in "organic" food with a press release saying they were; and energy, where Russia funds environmental groups to undermine natural gas so they can control Europe using a strategic resource while Germany can claim they have a larger percent of "renewable" energy domestically than would be possible if their energy was generated locally.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Our Food Supply Was Built On Engineering Plants: The War On Science Risks That Food Security

Aug 21 2020 - 09:08
The majority of today's plant-based food was created using scientific optimization of traits - genetic engineering. Watermelons, bananas, tomatoes, lettuce, and corn are all great examples of genetically engineered foods that few realize are not natural even if they carry an "organic" manufacturing process sticker.

Despite that success, government-funded scientists are reporting less funding than ever and the reason is largely because the private sector has done so well. It may also be because the war against agriculture is being waged by those often in the same political tribe as those who want to pursue a career in academia. No one wants to be shamed at parties because they do science that a giant chunk of people educated by marketing dislike.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Fabien Cousteau's Proteus Could Be The ISS Of The Ocean

Aug 21 2020 - 07:08

Aquanaut Fabien Cousteau — grandson of famed ocean explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau — has announced plans to build the world's biggest underwater base for scientific research.

He calls the facility "Proteus" and envisions it being the ocean equivalent of the International Space Station — a place where scientists from across the globe can work together to solve the world's biggest problems, from climate change to world hunger.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Melanoma: Why Lymph Nodes Matter In How Cancer Cells Spread

Aug 21 2020 - 06:08
If you or someone you know have gotten a cancer diagnosis, you know one of the first tests is to see if it has spread to your lymph nodes.

That is because they will often be a harbinger of spread to distant organs. Most cancer deaths happen after cancer spreads to other parts of the body through a process known as metastasis. This occurs when cancer cells from the primary tumor spread through blood vessels or migrate through lymphatic vessels before entering the blood.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

More Evidence That Emotional Expressions Are Universal

Aug 20 2020 - 15:08
Are smiles, scowls, or sympathetic sighs universal across cultures? Studies from Namibia to Bhutan have attempted to find out, but the findings have been too inconsistent to take seriously.

It may be because asking asking participants in a remote culture to match depictions of Western facial, bodily, or vocal expressions to situations or words in their native language is not the way to go.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Corgis And Noise, Retrievers And Surfaces - How You Can Reduce Fearfulness In Your Dog

Aug 20 2020 - 11:08
Fear of thunder or other loud noises, nervousness about new areas, and fear of slippery surfaces and heights are common among dogs but a new paper says these non-social fears can be mitigated.

Not for all dogs, the typical Cairn Terrier will remain more fearful than the average Chinese Crested Dog, but living environment and lifestyle will help.

What works, according to 14,000 dog owners surveyed? Exposure to new things as puppies. Insufficient socialization of puppies to various situations and new environments were a link with fearfulness related to novel situations, loud noises as well as different walking surfaces. The company of other dogs reduced the occurrence of non-social fear.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Hydrocodone, Lorazepam, Oxycodone And More Are Being Prescribed For Dementia With No Evidence They Work

Aug 20 2020 - 07:08
Data from 737,839 people with dementia find that 73.5 percent of them filled at least one prescription for an antidepressant, opioid painkiller, epilepsy drug, anxiety medication or antipsychotic drug in a one-year period. 

The percentages generally were even higher among women, non-Hispanic white patients, people in their late 60s and early 70s, and people with low incomes.

The problem; there is no evidence they work, they are not approved for off-label use in dementia, and some of the drugs have been linked to worse cognitive symptoms in old adults. 

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Consumers Don't Realize It But The Pandemic Has Clobbered Farmers

Aug 20 2020 - 06:08
Tennessee corn, soybean, cotton and wheat producers are estimated to have declines in income of $58.8 million, $21.4 million, $20.3 million and $1.2 million, respectively, for a total decline of $101.7 million - and that's just what is known right now.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

COVID-19 Is Not Transmitted Through Breast Milk

Aug 19 2020 - 17:08
Samples of breast milk collected by the Mommy's Milk Human Milk Research Biorepository from women infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) only showed one positive for viral RNA. However, subsequent tests found that the virus was unable to replicate, and thus unable to cause infection in the breastfed infant.

There have been no documented cases to-date of an infant contracting COVID-19 as a result of consuming infected breast milk but without studies it was hard to be sure, to this is good news for families with new babies.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Alaska's Salmon Are Getting Smaller, And The Natural Fetish For 'wild Caught' Is To Blame

Aug 19 2020 - 15:08
Try to imagine a world where people though wild lettuce was a status symbol and superior to lettuce grown on a farm; a salad would cost $400.

That is the problem with salmon. Elite customers want to know a laborer sweated for it, they insist if it is farmed it must be inferior but unlike organic certified pineapples or non-GMO rock salt, the naturalist fetish has real world consequences when it comes to the sea. Salmon are getting smaller, because they are spending less time at sea before being caught.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Terminator 2 T-1000 Gets Closer: A New Material That Can Autonomously Heal In Air And Underwater

Aug 19 2020 - 00:08
A new epoxy material is a first-of-its-kind, 3-D printable, stimuli-responsive polymeric material that enable massive reconfigurability in future military platforms, according to a recent paper.

It will have embedded intelligence allowing it to autonomously adapt to its environment without any external control. It is a system of materials to simultaneously provide structure, sensing and response.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Assholery In Academia

Aug 18 2020 - 19:08
Have you ever behaved like an a**hole? Or did you ever have the impulse to do so? Did you ever use your position, your status, your authority to please yourself by crushing some ego? Please answer this in good faith to yourself - nobody is looking behind your shoulders. Take a breath. I know, it's hard to admit it. But we all have.

It is, after all, part of human nature. Humans are ready to make huge sacrifices to acquire a status or a position from which they can harass other human beings. Perhaps we have the unspoken urge to take revenge of the times when we were at the receiving end of such harassment. Or maybe we just tasted the sweet sensation it gives to use your power against somebody who can't fight back.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Pesticide Use In Germany Went Down, So Why Are Environmentalists Angry?

Aug 18 2020 - 12:08
German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture data show that use of crop protection products, e.g. pesticides, went down last year and Agriculture Minister Julia Klöckner notes that has been the trend since 2012. Klöckner says it shows Germany is "on the right track" when it comes to reducing use of pesticides but anti-science groups are angry.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

With No Bee Deaths Happening, Activists Now Say Birds Are Dying From Neonicotinoids

Aug 17 2020 - 16:08
Though periodic deaths of bees continue to happen, and have been documented for as long as records of bees have been kept, over 1,000 years, efforts to blame the most recent statistical blip on a newer class of pesticides designed to reduce pesticide usage, neonicotinoids, have fallen flat. Parasites remain the big killer, as does winter, even changes in land. Arguably the only thing not killing bees are seed treatments created so there would be less pesticide in the environment.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Flying Dinosaurs: Anchiornithine Theropods As The Earliest Birds

Aug 17 2020 - 12:08
A new paper supports the traditional relationship of dromaeosaurid ('raptors') and troodontid theropods as the closest relatives of birds, but also supports the status of the controversial anchiornithine theropods as the earliest birds.

The authors say theirs is the most comprehensive study of feathered dinosaurs and early birds into the evolutionary relationships of dinosaurs at the origin of birds. They used an analytical pipeline to search for evolutionary trees, and estimated how each species may have crossed the stringent thresholds for powered flight.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Sour Beer: The Science

Aug 17 2020 - 10:08

Sour beer is not a defect. Some people like the tart, tangy brew which results when wild yeast and bacteria are allowed to grow in freshly brewed beer (wort) and then ferment.

It's the opposite of the fresher beer many desire and began as a niche market in in Europe long ago. Now it's taking off in the U.S. the way IPAs did a decade ago. 

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Twistors: A New Direction For A Unified Theory

Aug 16 2020 - 14:08
What is a twistor, and why should we care? Well, I may not be the most qualified blogger out here to give you an answer, but I will try to at least give you an idea. Before I do, though, maybe first of all I should say why I am discussing here a rather obscure mathematical concept, in this typically experimental-physics-oriented blog.

Twistor theory is a mathematical construction that dates back to the sixties, and is probably mostly known for some of its uses within string theory. Funnily enough, it has now been brought to the fore by Peter Woit, a mathematical physicist from Columbia University who became internationally renowned when he published his 2006 book "Not Even Wrong".

read more

Categories: Science 2.0