Body

Angiocidin, a tumor-inhibiting novel protein discovered by Temple University researchers, may also have a role as a new therapeutic application in treating leukemia, according to a study by the researchers.

It's not always easy spotting the cuckoo in the nest. But if you don't, you pay a high price raising someone else's chick. How hosts distinguish impostor eggs from their own has long puzzled scientists. The problem remained largely unsolved while looking at it through our own eyes. It was only when people started thinking from the birds' perspective that they began to understand how hosts recognise a cuckoo egg in the nest. Marcel Honza from the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic explains that birds see UV wavelengths that are well outside our own visual range.

The expectation that East-Asian people emphasize physical symptoms of depression (e.g. headaches, poor appetite or aches/pains in the body) is widely acknowledged, yet the few available empirical studies report mixed data on this issue. A new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) debunks this cultural myth, and offers clinicians valuable insight to into cultural context when assessing a patient, leading to more accurate diagnosis.

CAMDEN -- For some consumers, the way a cup of mineral water tastes has more to do with the container than the contents. Especially for consumers who are less likely to enjoy touching items or products before deciding to buy them.

According to new research conducted by Maureen Morrin, an associate professor of marketing at the Rutgers School of Business—Camden, manufacturers and marketers need to consider how their product packaging feels if they want consumers to make the purchase.

Following a low-sodium diet does not appear to have any appreciable impact on asthma control, according to new research.

Contrary to past studies — which have suggested a link between low-sodium diets and improved asthma control — a new study by researchers at The University of Nottingham found no evidence that cutting back on salt helps patients with their symptoms.

Under the direction of the Helmholtz Zentrum München, a German research group studied in a longitudinal study, over six years, whether associations are identifiable between the onset of atopic diseases and exposure to air pollutants originating from traffic. The scientists based their analysis, on the one hand, on the corresponding distance of the parental home to streets busy with traffic, and on the other hand, modeled values, for the respective residencial addresses of the children, of air pollution with fine dust, diesel soot and nitrogen dioxide.

There are two completely different diseases known as diabetes. Type 1 is an autoimmune condition that often starts in childhood or adolescence. Type 2 is a metabolic disorder sometimes associated with lifestyle. In both cases, the insulin-secreting beta cells in the pancreas die, albeit at different rates.

Until now, it was thought that the processes leading to beta cell death were similar in both diseases. Scientists at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney have now shown that the causes of cell death are quite different.

Six treatments for smoking cessation perform better than placebos — including varenicline (Chantix®), recently approved for use in Canada — states a team of researchers from McGill University and the University of Montreal in an article published in CMAJ.

Indoor air quality has a greater impact on health than outdoor air quality, as North American adults spend almost 90% of their time indoors. Exposure to chemical and biological contaminants and possible cancer-causing agents is possible, and can contribute to the risk of developing respiratory and neurologic symptoms, allergies, asthma and lung cancer.

1. Young Adults With Prehypertension Are More Likely to Have Coronary Artery Calcium and Atherosclerosis Later in Life

Current measures of hospital mortality, especially when derived from administrative data, are limited as a performance measure. Researchers from the Ottawa Health Research Institute and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto suggest other ways to measure performance in this analysis of the hospital standardized mortality ratio. More comprehensive measures based on detailed clinical data and other measures are necessary, although this will require additional resources.

PHILADELPHIA, July 15, 2008 – Prehypertension during young adulthood is common and is associated with subsequent coronary atherosclerosis, according to a study published in today's issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

Hospitals' efforts to improve patient safety rely on several methods of monitoring and evaluating the occurrence of adverse events: including incident reports from members of the health care team, automated surveillance of clinical data, and review of medical records. A group of Massachusetts researchers report in the July 15 Annals of Internal Medicine that surveying patients about their experiences can provide additional important information.

ARTICLE #1 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Detecting flu viruses in remote areas of the worldJournal of the American Chemical Society

Scientists are reporting a new method that uses sugar molecules instead of antibodies to detect influenza.

(Photo Credit: Courtesy of Cynthia Goldsmith, CDC)

DALLAS – July 14, 2008 – Global warming is likely to increase the proportion of the population affected by kidney stones by expanding the higher-risk region known as the "kidney-stone belt" into neighboring states, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center and UT Dallas have found.