Tech

The many threats facing bumblebees can be tested using a "virtual safe space" created by scientists at the University of Exeter.
Bumble-BEEHAVE provides a computer simulation of how colonies will develop and react to multiple factors including pesticides, parasites and habitat loss.

Lithium ion batteries have come a long way since their introduction in the late 1990s. They're used in many everyday devices, such as laptop computers, mobile phones, and medical devices, as well as automotive and aerospace platforms, and others. However, lithium ion battery performance still can decay over time, may not fully charge after many charge/discharge cycles, and may discharge quickly even when idle.

Preschoolers can learn a lot from educational television, but younger toddlers may learn more from interactive digital media (such as video chats and touchscreen mobile apps) than from TV and videos alone, which don't require them to interact. That's the conclusion of a new article that also notes that because specific conditions that lead to learning from media are unclear, not all types of interactive media increase learning and not all children learn to the same degree from these media.

Washington, DC (May 22, 2018) -- An investigational new drug offers hope of relief for celiac disease patients who are inadvertently exposed to gluten while on a gluten-free diet. Findings of the first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018. Inadvertent exposure to gluten can be a frequent occurrence for celiac patients that triggers symptoms, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, due to intestinal damage.

Study implications

Washington, DC (May 22, 2018) -- For the first time in humans, researchers will test a two-pronged approach to treat advanced stage colorectal cancer (CRC), potentially increasing life expectancy. Combining a DNA vaccine, which boosts the body's immune response against tumors, with an antibody that blocks the body's natural defense against the potency of the DNA vaccine, may lead to the development of an effective treatment for late stage CRC, when a cure is not often possible.

Washington, DC (May 22, 2018) -- Increasingly, liver transplant centers are changing a long-standing practice of delaying potentially life-saving liver transplantation for patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis until after they stopped drinking alcohol for six months, according to a new study scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018.

Study implications

Washington, D.C. (May 22, 2018) -- Ingestion of a blue dye tablet during bowel prep for colonoscopy could be a significant advance in the early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). When used in conjunction with colonoscopy, the blue dye increased adenoma detection rate (ADR) by nearly 9 percent, according to a study scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018.

Study implications

Researchers report important new insights into evolution following a study of mitochondrial DNA from about 5 million specimens covering about 100,000 animal species.

Mining "big data" insights from the world's fast-growing genetic databases and reviewing a large literature in evolutionary theory, researchers at The Rockefeller University in New York City and the Biozentrum at the University of Basel in Switzerland, published several conclusions today in the journal Human Evolution. Among them:

Higher body temperatures speed our bodies' responses to infections, wounds and tumours - researchers at the Universities of Warwick and Manchester prove

Slight rise in temperature and inflammation - such as a fever - speeds up cellular 'clock' in which proteins switch genes on and off to respond to infection

New understanding could lead to more effective and fast-working drugs which target a key inflammation protein found to be critical for the temperature response

The Computer Science and Engineering Research Team at the Toyohashi University of Technology has measured the pupil (referred to as the "black part" of the eye) when a person is inspired by an object. It is known that the pupil dilates and narrows to adjust the amount of light entering the eye, and that the extent of dilation/narrowing varies depending on the emotional state of the person. In the present study, we measured the reaction of the pupil when a person is shown a video made to elicit inspiration (a video in which an object gradually appears).