Tech

PHILADELPHIA -- (Dec. 14, 2017) -- A new study from The Wistar Institute revealed the mechanism implicated in the defective function of tumor-associated dendritic cells (DCs), a specialized type of immune cells that expose the antigens on their surface to activate the T cells. The new findings explain why DCs are not effective in executing a specialized process that is required for inducing antitumor immune responses and effective cancer immunotherapy. The work was published online in Nature Communications.

New computational strategies reported this week in Science might help realize the promise of peptide-based drugs. Peptides are similar to protein molecules, but differ in their smaller size, structure and functions.

Macrocyclic peptides have sparked pharmaceutical industry interest, because they have certain physical and chemical properties that could become the basis of a new generation of medications.

Oxford, December 14, 2017 - A new technique developed by researchers at Technische Universität München, Forschungszentrum Jülich, and RWTH Aachen University, published in Elsevier's Materials Today, provides a unique insight into how the charging rate of lithium ion batteries can be a factor limiting their lifetime and safety.

Previously unknown functions of natural killer cells identified

Cells remodel and 'refresh' the lining of the womb in preparation for pregnancy

Process isn't always balanced in each cycle

Could lead to screening and treatment for women at risk of miscarriage

For the first time the functions of natural killer cells in the womb have been identified.

Researchers at the University of Warwick and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW) NHS Trust have discovered the role that they play in preparing the womb for pregnancy.

Two Johns Hopkins prostate cancer researchers found significant disparities when they submitted identical patient samples to two different commercial liquid biopsy providers. Liquid biopsy is a new and noninvasive alternative to tumor tissue sequencing, and it is intended to specifically detect and sequence tumor DNA circulating in patients' blood. The results are used to help guide doctors to tailor the best treatment for patients at each point of their disease.

With hospitals more often reaching for antibiotics of last resort to fight infections and recent Ebola and Zika outbreaks crossing borders like never before, the worldwide scientific community has been challenged with developing new antimicrobials to safeguard the population.

The research arm of the U.S. Department of Defense, the Defense Advanced Research Program Agency, or DARPA, is known for taking on out-sized challenges such as this. And so, they put out a call for researchers to figure out how to make at least 1000 doses to any unknown pathogen - in a week.

Researchers have found a new potential treatment that may alleviate complications of babies born smaller than they should be, also called fetal growth restriction, which refers to poor growth of the fetus in the mother's womb during pregnancy. The findings were published in the Journal of Physiology.

The comfort food we know and love today as the potato was domesticated between 8,000 and 10,000 years ago from a wild species native to the Andes Mountains in southern Peru. During the 16th century, Spanish conquistadors are believed to have transported the rugged root-like vegetable across the Atlantic.

Now, a team of researchers has charted this lineage in order to learn how the potato was domesticated and how its DNA evolved over time.

ATLANTA -- Lactic acid bacteria, commonly used as probiotics to improve digestive health, can offer protection against different subtypes of influenza A virus, resulting in reduced weight loss after virus infection and lower amounts of virus replication in the lungs, according to a study led by Georgia State University.

MADISON, Wis. -- A Brazilian-American research group has just published an unusual study outlining data needs for monitoring the survival of monkeys called muriquis that live in patches of forest in Brazil.

"If you want to preserve the muriquis, exactly what do you need to know?" asks Leandro Jerusalinsky, one of the authors of a report published today (Dec. 13, 2017) in the journal PLOS ONE. "This was the essential question, focusing on identifying population trends and conservation priorities."