Body

SINGAPORE, 19 September 2017 - A new study of those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) with and without cerebrovascular disease (CeVD) has found that there are likely differential brain network changes suggesting differences in the underlying pathology for each of these seemingly similar brain disorders.

Researchers at University of San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new tool called the San Diego Wisdom Scale (SD-WISE) to assess an individual's level of wisdom, based upon a conceptualization of wisdom as a trait with a neurobiological as well as psychosocial basis.

The findings are published in the September 2017 issue of the Journal of Psychiatric Research.

In an analysis of the epigenomes of people and mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Institutes of Health report that drinking alcohol may induce changes to a cholesterol-regulating gene.

The findings suggest that these changes to the gene, known as PCSK9, may explain at least some of the differences in how cholesterol is processed in people who drink alcohol, or may affect those taking a relatively new class of PCSK9 cholesterol-lowering drugs designed to reduce LDL cholesterol, commonly known as bad cholesterol.

While people protect their eyes from the sun's radiation during a solar eclipse, NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is working to protect the whole human body from radiation in space. Space radiation is dangerous and one of the primary health risks for astronauts.

Sept. 20, 2017, AUSTIN, Texas - Some women are seeking abortion services outside the formal health care system in Great Britain, where abortion is legally available, citing reasons such as access barriers, privacy concerns and controlling circumstances, according to new research from Abigail Aiken, an assistant professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin. The peer-reviewed study was published Wednesday in Contraception, an international reproductive health journal.

Sophia Antipolis, 20 September 2017: Treatment of heart attack patients depends on their history of cancer, according to research published today in European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care.1 The study in more than 35 000 heart attack patients found they were less likely to receive recommended drugs and interventions, and more likely to die in hospital if they had cancer than if they did not.

BOSTON--September 20, 2017-- Though seniors with type 2 diabetes (T2D) tend to have normal or higher bone density than their peers, researchers have found that they are more likely to succumb to fractures than seniors without T2D. In a new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research found older adults with type 2 diabetes had deficits in cortical bone--the dense outer surface of bone that forms a protective layer around the internal cavity-- compared to non-diabetics.

The journal Andrologia has published the first report of abnormal sperm parameters in obese men based on computer aided sperm analysis. The findings suggest that clinicians may need to factor in paternal obesity prior to assisted reproduction.

In the study of 1285 men, obesity was associated with lower volume of semen, sperm count, concentration, and motility, as well as greater sperm defects.

Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased fracture risk despite normal or high bone mineral density. In a new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, modest deficits in cortical bone--the dense outer surface of bone that forms a protective layer around the internal cavity--were demonstrated in older adults with type 2 diabetes compared with non-diabetics.

Additional studies are needed to determine if addressing structural deterioration of cortical bone may reduce the risk of fracture in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

A phase 1 clinical trial published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology found that radavirsen -- an antisense oligomer that inhibits the production of certain influenza proteins -- is safe and well-tolerated in healthy individuals. Additional studies on radavirsen's potential as a treatment for influenza are warranted

In the 56-participant trial, pharmacokinetic analyses indicated that at 8mg/kg, radavirsen is expected to be effective in the treatment of influenza.