Earth

STONE TOWN, Zanzibar, Tanzania (Dec.14, 2017) - A team of WCS scientists recently completed the first-ever range-wide population census of the Zanzibar red colobus monkey (Piliocolobus kirkii) an endangered primate found only on the Zanzibar archipelago off the coast of East Africa.

A mating strategy among redback spiders where males seek out immature females appears to benefit both sexes, a new U of T Scarborough study has found.

"There's no evidence to suggest this behaviour is costly to females in terms of survivorship and reproductive output," says postdoc Luciana Baruffaldi, director of the Andrade Lab and lead author of the research.

Residents in some areas of the developing world are currently coping with dangerous levels of air pollution. Recent research, co-led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, is leading to a new understanding of a key chemical able to break down some major air pollutants.

RENO, Nev. - Around two million years ago, a genetic change occurred that differentiated humans from most other primates that both protected humans from diseases, yet made red meat a health risk.

At this point in human evolution, a certain gene, known as CMAH, that allows for the synthesis of a sugar called Neu5Gc, went missing. This sugar is present in red meats, some fish and dairy products. When humans consume an animal that has that gene, the body has an immune reaction to the foreign sugar, which can cause inflammation, arthritis, and cancer.

Scientists working to protect California's most endangered salmon say in a new report that key improvements in tracking Sacramento River winter-run Chinook through California's complex water delivery system would help recover the species while the water continues to flow.

Based on a decade of data from Pennsylvania, researchers report that babies born to mothers living within 1 kilometer of active "fracking" wells are 25% more likely to exhibit low birthweight - a risk factor for infant mortality, ADHD, asthma, and other negative outcomes. The results reflect a possible health consequence of exposure to fracking pollutants. To date, concerns about the impact of the fracking process on human health, particularly at the local level, are unresolved.

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Approaching the second half of the century, the United States is likely to experience increases in the number of days with extreme heat, the frequency and duration of heat waves, and the length of the growing season. In response, it is anticipated that societal, agricultural and ecological needs will increase the demand on already-strained natural resources like water and energy. University of Illinois researchers have developed new, high-resolution climate models that may help policymakers mitigate these effects at a local level.

It may take until the 2060s to know how much the sea level will rise by the end of this century, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick-led analysis. The study is the first to link global and local sea-level rise projections with simulations of two major mechanisms by which climate change can affect the vast Antarctic ice sheet.

Depending on whether a species flourishes in a city environment, urban wildlife populations can be "sources" or "sinks," either reproducing so quickly that individuals leave to colonize the surrounding area or needing constant immigration from outside to stay viable. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications examines the population dynamics of Cooper's Hawks in urban Albuquerque, New Mexico, and finds that city-born birds aren't just thriving -- they're actually forcing their rural neighbors out of their nest sites.

On August 21, 2017, about 215 million American adults watched one of nature's most dramatic events: a total solar eclipse. However, most of the country could only see a partial eclipse. The path of the total eclipse was a strip just 70 miles wide, arcing across the country from Oregon to South Carolina.