NEW ORLEANS, March 18, 2018 -- Setting off smoke bombs is more than good fun on the Fourth of July. The military uses smoke grenades in dangerous situations to provide cover for people and tanks on the move. But the smoke arms race is on. Increasingly, sensors can now go beyond the visible range into the infrared (IR) region of the spectrum. Today, researchers report developing a new kind of smoke that obscures both visible and IR detection.

CHICAGO--Patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery may be at greater risk for non-vertebral fracture than those having adjustable gastric banding (AGB), a new population-based study reports. The results will be presented on Saturday, March 17 at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.

CHICAGO -- New research in mice provides an explanation for how exposure to the widely used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy, even at levels lower than the regulated "safe" human exposure level, can lead to altered brain development and behavior later in life. The research will be presented Monday, March 19 at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill.

CHICAGO -- Chemicals found in a variety of routinely used consumer products may be contributing to the substantial drop in sperm counts and sperm quality among men in recent decades, a new study in mice suggests.

The study found the effect of chemicals that disrupt the body's hormones, called endocrine-disrupting chemicals, may extend beyond more than one generation. The research results will be presented Monday, March 19, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Chicago, Ill.

CHICAGO--A new study lends further evidence to a suspected link between abnormal breast growth in young boys--called prepubertal gynecomastia--and regular exposure to lavender or tea tree oil, by finding that key chemicals in these common plant-derived oils act as endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The study results will be presented Monday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago.

Cells made by fusing a normal human muscle cell with a muscle cell from a person with Duchenne muscular dystrophy --a rare but fatal form of muscular dystrophy -- were able to significantly improve muscle function when implanted into the muscles of a mouse model of the disease. The findings are reported by researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago in the Stem Cell Review and Reports.

On the seafloor of the shallow coastal regions north of Siberia, microorganisms produce methane when they break down plant remains. If this greenhouse gas finds its way into the water, it can also become trapped in the sea ice that forms in these coastal waters. As a result, the gas can be transported thousands of kilometres across the Arctic Ocean and released in a completely different region months later. This phenomenon is the subject of an article by researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute, published in the current issue of the online journal Scientific Reports.

Everyone has experienced the awkward situation of meeting someone and then forgetting their name shortly after. Among older adults, this happens more often than not.

Baycrest researchers have discovered a new method to resolve this problem by tapping into a natural memory change during aging. Their work, which was recently published in the journal, Psychology and Aging, could be incorporated into a smartphone application as an accessible memory training tool.

Tiny jumping fish can leap further as they get older, new research shows.

Mangrove rivulus are capable of "tail-flip jumping" many times their body length when out of water, allowing them to escape predators and find better habitats.

Researchers from the universities of Exeter and Alabama looked at how physical traits and age affected how far the fish - found in the US, the Bahamas and Central America - could jump.

In application, strength and stability of single microgels are important for controlling functions. However, their mechanical properties have been little known due to measurement difficulty. Miho Yanagisawa and Atsushi Sakai at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology and their colleagues succeeded in measuring the elasticity of single microgels by pulling the with a microcapillary and quantifying deformation and pressure during aspiration.