Earth

Primates are fascinating. They are intelligent, live in complex societies and are a vital part of the ecosystem. Lemurs, lorises, galagos, tarsiers, monkeys and apes are our closest biological relatives and just like them, humans are also primates. However, while the human population spread to all corners of the earth, many of our closest relatives are under serious threat.

Tropical Depression Gaemi moved through Taiwan and was tracking to the northeast in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on June 15. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the storm that showed it as an elongated system.

Tropical Depression 04E formed close to the coast of southwestern Mexico on June 14, and early the next day NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region. Using infrared light, Aqua identified where the strongest storms were within 04E.

Tropical Depression 04E formed on June 14 at 5 p.m. EDT about 100 miles (155 km) south of Acapulco, Mexico.

Tropical Depression Bud's rains were falling over western Mexico when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on June 15.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Bud after it weakened to a depression on June 15, 2018 at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) and analyzed the storm in infrared light. Infrared light provides temperature data and that's important when trying to understand how strong storms can be. The higher the cloud tops, the colder and the stronger they are.

A new investigation of how children reason about religious rules reveals a remarkable level of acceptance of different religions' rules and practices.

The study, appearing in the June 13 online edition of Child Development, found that both Hindu and Muslim children in India thought that Hindu children should follow Hindu norms and Muslim children should follow Muslim norms.

Human activity is causing the planet's mammals to flee daylight for the protection of night, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley.

The study, published today in the journal Science, and supported in part by the National Science Foundation, represents the first effort to quantify the global effects of human activity on the daily activity patterns of wildlife. Its results highlight the powerful and widespread process by which animals alter their behavior alongside people: human disturbance is creating a more nocturnal natural world.

Members of the public are more likely to blame the global marine litter crisis on retailers, industry and government, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth.

However, they have less faith in those agencies' motivation and competence to address the problem, placing greater trust in scientists and environmental groups to develop effective and lasting solutions.

The results were among the findings of a Europe-wide study which asked more than 1,100 members of the general public about their attitudes to marine litter.

A new study from the University of Waterloo discovered that rising sea levels could be accelerated by vulnerable ice shelves in the Antarctic.

The study, by an international team of polar scientists led by Canada Research Chair Christine Dow of Waterloo's Faculty of Environment, discovered that the process of warmer ocean water destabilizing ice shelves from below, is also cracking them apart from above, increasing the chance they'll break off.

NEW YORK (June 13, 2018)-- An age-old challenge of determining the right amount of fish to harvest from the sea has finally been overcome with the creation of a new biomass-yield model that captures all the necessary factors for accuracy, according to a new WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) study.

The study titled "Multicriteria estimate of coral reef fishery sustainability" appears online in the journal Fish and Fisheries.

NASA examined the rainfall rates occurring in former Hurricane Bud as it continued moving north in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, paralleling the western coast of Mexico. On June 13, Bud weakened to a tropical storm and warnings have been posted from the Mexican government.
On June 12, 2018 at 7:27 p.m. EDT (2327 UTC), the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite passed above hurricane Bud in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Bud's movement over colder waters had caused its eye to become less defined as the storm weakened.