NEW YORK, NY (JUNE 18, 2018)-- Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) have developed a highly innovative computational framework that can support personalized cancer treatment by matching individual tumors with the drugs or drug combinations that are most likely to kill them.

Tel Aviv -- June 18, 2018 -- New data published in Nature Biotechnology, represents the largest ever analysis of immune cell signaling research, mapping more than 3,000 previously unlisted cellular interactions, and yielding the first ever immune-centric modular classification of diseases. These data serve to rewrite the reference book on immune-focused inter-cellular communications and disease relationships.

Excessive drinking during adolescence may interfere with the activity of brain cells needed for sustaining short term memory, according to new research in adolescent male mice published in JNeurosci. The study could help scientists better understand the development of alcohol use disorders in adults.

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 18, 2018--Researchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week's edition of the journal Nature Materials.

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (http://www.ucr.edu) -- Earth's first complex animals were an eclectic bunch that lived in the shallow oceans between 580-540 million years ago.

The iconic Dickinsonia -- large flat animals with a quilt-like appearance -- were joined by tube-shaped organisms, frond-like creatures that looked more like plants, and several dozen other varieties already characterized by scientists.

Add to that list two new animals discovered by a UC Riverside-led team of researchers:

Communication could step beyond reading a cellular phone screen with a new technique by Purdue College of Engineering researchers to learn and read messages through a person's sense of touch.

Hong Tan, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, was the lead professor on the haptic research that developed a method to receive messages by learning to interpret signals such as a buzzing sensation and others through the skin on the forearm.

The research results were presented Friday (June 15) at the Proceedings of EuroHaptics 2018 conference in Pisa, Italy.

AUGUSTA, Ga. (June 18, 2018) - It's the comparative silence between the firing spikes of neurons that tells what they are really up to, scientists report.

"The brain appears to use these durations of silence to encrypt information," Dr. Joe Z. Tsien, neuroscientist at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University says of his new Neural Self-Information Theory.

ANN ARBOR--A diverse mix of species improves the stability and fuel-oil yield of algal biofuel systems, as well as their resistance to invasion by outsiders, according to the findings of a federally funded outdoor study by University of Michigan researchers.

U-M scientists grew various combinations of freshwater algal species in 80 artificial ponds at U-M's E.S. George Reserve near Pinckney in the first large-scale, controlled experiment to test the widely held idea that biodiversity can improve the performance of algal biofuel systems in the field.

Tropical Depression Gaemi moved through Taiwan and was tracking to the northeast in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on June 15. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the storm that showed it as an elongated system.

Tropical Depression 04E formed close to the coast of southwestern Mexico on June 14, and early the next day NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region. Using infrared light, Aqua identified where the strongest storms were within 04E.

Tropical Depression 04E formed on June 14 at 5 p.m. EDT about 100 miles (155 km) south of Acapulco, Mexico.