CORVALLIS, Ore. - Adding a daily 20 to 30 minute self-regulation intervention to a kindergarten readiness program significantly boosted children's self-regulation and early academic skills, an Oregon State University researcher has found.

STONE TOWN, Zanzibar, Tanzania (Dec.14, 2017) - A team of WCS scientists recently completed the first-ever range-wide population census of the Zanzibar red colobus monkey (Piliocolobus kirkii) an endangered primate found only on the Zanzibar archipelago off the coast of East Africa.

LA JOLLA -- (Dec. 14, 2017) In the bustling setting of the cell, proteins encounter each other by the thousands. Despite the hubbub, each one manages to selectively interact with just the right partners, thanks to specific contact regions on its surface that are still far more mysterious than might be expected, given decades of research into protein structure and function.

A mating strategy among redback spiders where males seek out immature females appears to benefit both sexes, a new U of T Scarborough study has found.

"There's no evidence to suggest this behaviour is costly to females in terms of survivorship and reproductive output," says postdoc Luciana Baruffaldi, director of the Andrade Lab and lead author of the research.

New computational strategies reported this week in Science might help realize the promise of peptide-based drugs. Peptides are similar to protein molecules, but differ in their smaller size, structure and functions.

Macrocyclic peptides have sparked pharmaceutical industry interest, because they have certain physical and chemical properties that could become the basis of a new generation of medications.

Astronomers have come up with a new and improved method for measuring the masses of millions of solitary stars, especially those with planetary systems.

Getting accurate measurements of how much stars weigh not only plays a crucial role in understanding how stars are born, evolve and die, but it is also essential in assessing the true nature of the thousands of exoplanets now known to orbit most other stars.

A 60-year-old mystery about the source of energetic, potentially damaging particles in Earth's radiation belts has been solved using data from a shoebox-sized satellite built and operated by students. The satellite is called a CubeSat.

Imagine a fully instrumented satellite the size of a half-gallon milk carton. Then imagine that milk carton whirling in space, catching never-before-seen glimpses of atmospheric and geospace processes.

A METHOD for quickly detecting signs of multiple sclerosis has been developed by a University of Huddersfield research team.

The discovery, using advanced mass spectrometry techniques, offers a diagnostic tool that enables the detection of multiple sclerosis (MS) to be made simply using blood samples. The current procedure for detection requires the invasive, often painful, process of collecting fluid from the brain and spine.

The research has identified two natural biomarker compounds, which have been linked to multiple sclerosis.

A riot of colour and light dances through this peculiarly shaped galaxy, NGC 5256. Its smoke-like plumes are flung out in all directions and the bright core illuminates the chaotic regions of gas and dust swirling through the galaxy's centre. Its odd structure is due to the fact that this is not one galaxy, but two -- in the process of a galactic collision.

Previously unknown functions of natural killer cells identified

Cells remodel and 'refresh' the lining of the womb in preparation for pregnancy

Process isn't always balanced in each cycle

Could lead to screening and treatment for women at risk of miscarriage

For the first time the functions of natural killer cells in the womb have been identified.

Researchers at the University of Warwick and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW) NHS Trust have discovered the role that they play in preparing the womb for pregnancy.