(CHICAGO) - Levels of a protein found in the brain called alpha-synuclein (α-syn) are significantly lower than normal in cerebrospinal fluid collected in Parkinson's disease patients suffering from postural instability and gait difficulty, a study led by movement disorders experts at Rush University Medical Center has found. The results recently were published online in the journal Movement Disorders.

What happens when six graduate students in different fields, who happen to be friends, put their heads together on an emerging issue in climate change?

They get published in a major journal.

CORVALLIS, Ore. - How a person responds to a difficult life event such as a death or divorce helps shape the development of their wisdom over time, a new study from Oregon State University suggests.

Modern humans have brains that are more than three times larger than our closest living relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos. Scientists don't agree on when and how this dramatic increase took place, but new analysis of 94 hominin fossils shows that average brain size increased gradually and consistently over the past three million years.

Human sperms are incredibly important for our reproduction. It would therefore be easy to assume that we have detailed knowledge of their appearance. However, an international team of researchers has now identified a completely new nanostructure inside sperm tails, thanks to the use of cryo-electron tomography.

The method, for which Joachim Frank, Jacques Dubochet and Richard Henderson were awarded a Nobel Prize in 2017, produces 3D images of cellular structures.

A team of American Museum of Natural History researchers has created a computational model capable of predicting whether or not organisms have the ability to "eat" other cells through a process known as phagocytosis. The model may be a useful tool for large-scale microbe surveys and provides valuable insight into the evolution of complex life on Earth, challenging ideas put forward in recent studies. The model and researchers' findings are featured in a paper published today in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.

Porpoises communicate with each other using sounds. Therefore, they are highly sensitive to noise, such as ship noise. And the Danish belts and sounds are some of the most heavily trafficked waters in the world.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 20, 2018 -- Nobody really likes bargain hot cocoa powder. It's lumpy, it's too thin and it leaves scummy residue behind. But premium hot cocoa mix is too expensive for some imbibers. Fortunately, Reactions is here with some easy kitchen chemistry hacks to turn cheap cocoa mix into a satisfying cold weather pick-me-up: https://youtu.be/7M105LuTJvo.

PHILADELPHIA (Feb. 20, 2018) - Studies have shown that talking with teens about sex-related topics is a positive parenting practice that facilitates important sexual health outcomes with heterosexual adolescents. But for LGBTQ youth, the topic of sexuality and sexual health is often ineffectively addressed at home.

OAK BROOK, Ill. - An MRI breast imaging technique that requires no contrast agent, combined with sophisticated data analysis, could reduce the number of unnecessary breast biopsies, according to a new study appearing online in the journal Radiology.

Breast MRI currently is used to screen women at high risk of breast cancer and as a diagnostic adjunct to mammography. The examination relies on gadolinium-based contrast agents that need to be injected intravenously.