Tech

HOUSTON - (Nov. 16, 2017) - Rice University engineers are using 3-D printers to turn structures that have until now existed primarily in theory into strong, light and durable materials with complex, repeating patterns.

The porous structures called schwarzites are designed with computer algorithms, but Rice researchers found they could send data from the programs to printers and make macroscale, polymer models for testing. Their samples strive to use as little material as possible and still provide strength and compressibility.

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that diffusion plays an unexpected role in cell differentiation during the early stages of development in the embryos of Drosophila, or fruit flies. Instead of spreading a molecular signal out, it was found that diffusion, facilitated through a carrier molecule, actually concentrates the signal in one place. This "facilitated diffusion" mechanism has previously been found in other systems, and the new finding indicates it may be more widespread than previously thought.

New Rochelle, NY, November 16, 2017--With what strategies should developing countries invest in for emerging biotechnologies and precision medicine? This timely question on biotechnology global development was discussed in an innovation analysis published in OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology. The analysis, co-authored by Vural Özdemir, MD, PhD, DABCP (Toronto, Canada) and George P. Patrinos (Patras, Greece), notes that an "astutely global, and yet customized strategy for applications of omics and biotechnology innovations across countries and populations is sorely missing.

London, Nov. 16, 2017 - Neanderthals survived at least 3,000 years longer than we thought in Southern Iberia - what is now Spain - long after they had died out everywhere else, according to new research published in Heliyon.

A new technique devised by researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Calgary provides a more in-depth look at the composition of and activity within microbial communities - the microscopic life within our bodies and all around us.

The glaciers that carved Yosemite Valley left highly polished surfaces on many of the region's rock formations. These smooth, shiny surfaces, known as glacial polish, are common in the Sierra Nevada and other glaciated landscapes.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Heart failure after a heart attack is a global epidemic leading to chronic heart failure pathology. About 6 million people in the United States and 23 million worldwide suffer from this end-stage disease.

Ganesh Halade, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, says researchers not only need to look at events in the heart as they seek ways to improve post-heart attack healing -- they also need to examine simultaneous changes taking place in the spleen and kidneys.

Why? Because the three organs are linked in the disease process.

Hamilton, ON, November 15, 2017 -- Children at one year old who have eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) and are sensitized to an allergen are seven times more likely than other infants to develop asthma, and significantly more likely to have a food allergy by age three.

This new finding from the Canadian CHILD Study will help doctors better predict which children will develop asthma and allergies, according to a paper published today by the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Wyss Center, Geneva, Switzerland - A new immersive virtual reality (VR) experience now offers a unique way to visualize and interact with large volumes of 3D anatomical brain data. The system, developed by researchers from the Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering and the University of Geneva, has applications in neurotechnology development, research and surgeon training. A poster describing the system will be presented on Wednesday 15 November at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience 2017, in Washington DC.

CINCINNATI -- Routine laboratory screening recommended for children entering foster care carries high costs and questionable medical benefits.

A new study, published online in Pediatrics, suggests that targeted screening may be a more clinically meaningful approach and reduce costs.