Tech

Mountain climbers and endurance athletes are not the only ones to benefit from altitude training - that is, learning to perform well under low-oxygen conditions. It turns out that cancer-fighting cells of the immune system can also improve their performance through a cellular version of such a regimen. In a study published in Cell Reports, Weizmann Institute of Science researchers have shown that immune system's killer T cells destroy cancerous tumors much more effectively after being starved for oxygen.

To the reasons that chemotherapy sometimes does not work, we can now add one more: bacteria. In a study published today in Science, researchers describe findings that certain bacteria can be found inside human pancreatic tumors. The findings further showed that some of these bacteria contain an enzyme that inactivates a common drug used to treat various cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Working with mouse models of cancer, they demonstrated how treatment with antibiotics on top of chemotherapy may be significantly superior to treatment with chemotherapy alone.

Many multiprocessor systems have interconnection networks as underlying topologies and an interconnection network is usually represented by a graph where nodes represent processors and links represent communication links between processors. For these systems, the study of topological properties of its interconnection network is important. In 2012, Peng et al.

Researchers are looking at advanced materials for roads and pavements that could generate electricity from passing traffic.

Engineers from Lancaster University are working on smart materials such as 'piezolectric' ceramics that when embedded in road surfaces would be able to harvest and convert vehicle vibration into electrical energy.

The research project, led by Professor Mohamed Saafi, will design and optimise energy recovery of around one to two Megawatts per kilometre under 'normal' traffic volumes -- which is around 2,000 to 3,000 cars an hour.

World-first transfer of light to acoustic information on a chip

Acoustic buffer parks photonic information in a sound wave for later retrieval

Hybrid chips useful in telecommunications networks and cloud computing

Researchers at the University of Sydney have dramatically slowed digital information carried as light waves by transferring the data into sound waves in an integrated circuit, or microchip.

It is the first time this has been achieved.

Tattoos and body piercings are an increasingly popular form of self-expression, but it is important for young people to carefully consider the consequences and potential risks associated with body modifications, according to the first clinical report on the topic published by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

WASHINGTON, D.C., Sept. 15, 2017 -- The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. As electronic devices get smaller, their ability to provide precise, chip-based sensing of dynamic physical properties such as motion become challenging to develop.

WASHINGTON - A child with non-traumatic abdominal pain, a common symptom of appendicitis, is more likely to receive a computed tomography (CT) scan in a general emergency department (ED) than if he or she visited a pediatric emergency department, according to a study published in Pediatrics.

Though overall use of CT in pediatric non-traumatic abdominal pain has plateaued since 2011, the study's findings indicate a significant difference in imaging protocol practices for children depending on where they are taken for emergency care.

With the help of an artist, a geology professor at Lund University in Sweden has figuratively speaking breathed life into one of science's most well-known fossil species; Agnostus pisiformis. The trilobite-like arthropod lived in huge numbers in Scandinavia a half-billion years ago. Today, this extinct species provides important clues for science in several ways.

A team of researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and the Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics (ITAE) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), in collaboration with a colleague from RIKEN (Institute for Physical and Chemical Research in Japan), has provided theoretical proof of the existence of a new class of materials. It was suggested that such systems be referred to as "spin-valley half-metals." The paper was published in the journal Physical Review Letters.