A group of researchers in the Department of Financial Economics II (Company Economics and Marketing) of the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Economics and Business has conducted a study that seeks to identify the factors driving the pro-environmental behaviour of university students; the aim is to be able to increase the effectiveness of university and Government interventions and policies in favour of the environment.

Tsukuba, Japan - Genes encode proteins and proteins dictate cell function. Therefore, the thousands of genes expressed in a cell determine what that cell can do. Among the multiple elements that are involved in the precise regulation of gene expression are enhancers, which are short region of DNA that can be bound by proteins (activators) to increase the likelihood of transcription of a particular gene.

New research has revealed how people's intelligence, rather than their personality traits, leads to success.

Researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Minnesota and Heidelberg devised a series of games to find out which factors lead to cooperative behaviour when people interact in social and workplace situations.

Their findings, due to be published in the Journal of Political Economy, showed that people with a higher IQ displayed 'significantly higher' levels of cooperation, which in turn led to them earning more money as part of the game.

EVANSTON, Ill. --- When drawing scientists, U.S. children now depict female scientists more often than ever, according to new Northwestern University research, which analyzed five decades of "Draw-A-Scientist" studies conducted since the 1960s.

This change suggests that children's stereotypes linking science with men have weakened over time, said the researchers, consistent with more women becoming scientists and children's media depicting more female scientists on television shows, magazines and other media.

The participation of women in science has risen significantly in the United States since the 1960s. A new meta-analysis reviewed five decades of "Draw a Scientist" tests to determine whether children's drawings have mirrored that change. The study found that U.S. children and adolescents today draw female scientists more often than in earlier decades, but overall, female scientists are still depicted much less frequently than males in children's and youths' drawings.

Most parenting programs aim to teach parents how to reduce their children's disruptive behavior. New research looked at more than 150 studies of these programs, finding differences in what works best according to whether or not children already showed behavior problems.

The work was conducted by researchers at the University of Amsterdam, Cardiff University, University of Oxford, and Utrecht University. It appears in the journal Child Development, a publication of the Society for Research in Child Development.

Philadelphia, March 20, 2018 - Steroids are currently the only available treatment to reduce the repetitive cycles of inflammation and disease progression associated with functional deterioration in patients with muscular dystrophy (MD).

ITHACA, N.Y. - Although scientists warn that urgent action is needed to stop climate change, public engagement continues to lag. Many social scientists say people are hesitant to act on climate change because, especially in Western industrialized countries like the U.S., it feels like such a distant threat.

New research from a Cornell University communication professor upends that conventional thinking.

The numbers of missed hospital outpatient appointments increases following the clock change in the spring, researchers have shown.

In a study, led by the University of York and Lancaster University, researchers revealed that patients are five per cent more likely to miss an appointment in the week after the clocks go forward compared with the previous week.

Psychologists analysed over two million appointments in Scotland from 2005 to 2010 before, during and after the spring and autumn clock changes.

Interest rate hikes by central banks can impact on the mental health of people in debt, a new study led by University of Stirling experts has found.

Central banks around the world use interest rates to control how much people and businesses spend or invest, in order to maintain a low-inflation, stable economy.