Brain

New Orleans, LA - A pilot case control study of veterans of the US armed forces with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) or persistent post-concussion syndrome (PPCS), with or without post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), has found significant improvements in persistent post-concussion syndrome and PTSD symptoms, neurological exam, memory, intelligence quotient, attention, cognition, depression, anxiety, quality of life, and brain blood flow following hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). Compared to controls, the patients' brain scans were significantly abnormal before treatment and became stat

Where people will go in the cosmos, plants will go. That's the message of a paper entitled "Gardening for Therapeutic People-Plant Interactions during Long-Duration Space Missions" written by Raymond Odeh, and Charles L. Guy of the University of Florida (Gainesville) and published in the De Gruyter journal, Open Agriculture.

Patients with a history of heart attack were more likely to use emotion-focused coping strategies for stress such as eating more or drinking alcohol, while patients without a history of heart attack or heart disease used problem-focused coping strategies, according to research to be presented at the 8th Emirates Cardiac Society Congress in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Middle East Conference October 19-21, 2017 in Dubai.

Novice gamblers who watched a short video about how slot machines disguise losses as wins have a better chance of avoiding gambling problems, according to new research.

Slot machines present losses disguised as wins (LDWs) with celebratory music and flashing lights, even though players actually won less money than they bet. People can mistakenly believe that they are winning and continue paying to play.

The gentle touch of another individual soothes the effects of social exclusion, one of the most emotionally painful human experiences, according to new UCL research.

The study, published today in Scientific Reports and funded by the European Research Council, tested the impact of a slow, affectionate touch against a fast, neutral touch following social rejection and found a specific relationship between gentle touch and social bonding.

Researchers have identified a region of the genome that regulates vitamin D activation in the kidneys, opening the door for more sophisticated treatments of diseases, including bone and immune disorders, involving vitamin D. The results of this research will be published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain after large stars die in a supernova explosion. The merger is the first cosmological event observed in both gravitational waves--ripples in the fabric of spacetime--and the entire spectrum of light, from gamma rays to radio waves.

More males and people of color are entering nursing, and more nurses are earning bachelor's degrees compared with a decade ago, according to a new study by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing researchers.

The study, published in the journal Nursing Outlook, also shows an improvement in working relationships between nurses and physicians.

In 2010, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published "The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health," a milestone report that provided recommendations on how nurses can best advance the nation's health.

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Pregnant women who had low socioeconomic status during childhood and who have poor family social support appear to prematurely age on a cellular level, potentially raising the risk for complications, a new study has found.

Researchers at The Ohio State University examined blood from pregnant women to evaluate the length of telomeres - structures at the end of chromosomes that are used by scientists as a measure of biological (as opposed to chronological) age. Shorter telomeres mean an older cellular age.