Brain

DURHAM, N.C. -- New research from Duke Health suggests baseball scouts looking for a consistent, conscientious hitter may find clues not only in their performance on the field, but also in front of a computer screen.

Repeated vaccination for influenza in older adults reduced the severity of the virus and reduced hospital admissions, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal)

A team of Spanish researchers looked at the effect of repeated influenza vaccinations in the current and 3 previous seasons in people aged 65 years and older admitted to 20 Spanish hospitals in 2013/14 and 2014/15 to determine whether repeat vaccination reduced severe influenza.

Washington, DC, Jan. 2, 2018 - Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) increases the risk of subsequent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among adolescent and young adult populations by about three times, reports a study published in the January 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP).

The authors also found that short- and long-term use of ADHD medication reduced the risk of subsequent STIs among men by 30% and 41%, respectively.

Male students tend to do better on high-stakes tests in biology courses, but it's not because they are better students. Gaps in performance change based on the stakes of the test. A new study published in PLOS ONE confirms this, finding that performance gaps between male and female students increased or decreased based on whether instructors emphasized or de-emphasized the value of exams.

The randomised controlled trial of more than 2,000 people in Lambeth and Southwark was led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and King's College London¹, in partnership with SH:24, a digital sexual health service.

December 26, 2017 - As 2017 comes to a close, many states have enacted laws and regulations expanding access to healthcare provided by advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), according to the 30th Annual Legislative Update in the January issue of The Nurse Practitioner, published by Wolters Kluwer.

Adolescents' use of alcohol is a risk factor for educational problems, diminished work capacity, disease, and later substance abuse and dependence. Many alcohol-prevention programs exist, but research has generally found their efficacy to be limited. In addition, these programs generally require schools to give up instructional time, which can negatively affect student achievement. A new study looked at the role played by peer groups in preventing alcohol use among students in rural middle schools.

A new analysis of the oldest known fossil microorganisms provides strong evidence to support an increasingly widespread understanding that life in the universe is common.

When brain lesions occur within the brain network responsible for morality and value-based decision-making, they can predispose a person toward criminal behavior, according to new research by Ryan Darby, MD, assistant professor of Neurology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC).

The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first systemic mapping of brain lesions associated with criminal behavior, a medical phenomena referred to as acquired sociopathy.

Tis the season for helping at a soup kitchen, caroling at a care facility or shoveling a neighbor's driveway.

While those gifts of self surely help others, new research suggests that such selfless and serving behaviors have a specific benefit to teens.